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Accion believes entrepreneurs create vibrant communities. We deliver a level of personalized service you won’t find at any other lender. Capital is just one tool you need to reach your goals, and we partner with you every step of the way.

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Maria Harrison
Tea Gallerie

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Odilon Celestin
C M Sweet Bakery

“Accion doesn’t just give you money they help you survive. My dream came true because I didn’t give up.”

Scott Carpenter
Underground Fitness

“I hit a lot of dead ends. Then I found Accion.”

Pamela A. Jones
Charboy’s

“At Accion, the loan process was straightforward. Now I have a whole line of sauces in 200 stores.”

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Loans to start a business

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Loans to start a business

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article

10 Essential Tips for Growing Your Business

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Brewing the American Dream

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3 Vital Components to Your Business Plan

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Running a business is hard work, but we re here to help. Get tips on everything from setting up your business to creating a website to paying taxes, based on Accion s experience helping entrepreneurs in every industry across the U.S.

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Loans to start a business

“At Accion, the loan process was straightforward. Now I have a whole line of sauces in 200 stores.”



Small Business

Early branding of a small or emerging company is key to business success. It is the quickest way for your company to express what it is and what it can offer. Inaccurate branding of a new business can make it difficult for people to grasp why the business exists in the first place.

What business to start

Articles and resources from AllBusiness.com

AllBusiness.com is a business Web site that provides information and services to small businesses.

Tip: Clear Brand Positioning Makes a Good Picture

By AllBusiness.com

Working with a consultant to create a logo or other branding materials? Make sure you think through and communicate your company’s positioning and core values.

If you can’t articulate what differentiates your company or product to your branding consultant, chances are they won’t be able to communicate it visually either. They need clear direction from which to craft a memorable, differentiated brand.

For startups and small businesses, branding can often take a backseat to other considerations, such as funding and product development. This is a mistake, as a company’s brand can be key to its success. Dollar for dollar, it is as important and vital as any other early steps.

One software management company, temporarily named TallyUp, decided to invest in a branding overhaul. Its flagship product, a software suite that tracks and runs bonus incentive plans, needed a clear identity and platform to appeal to its target audience — primarily financial executives. The name TallyUp, while somewhat descriptive, didn’t capture the level of sophistication needed to attract the appropriate clientele. TallyUp hired a branding consultant, who recommended the name Callidus (Latin for “expert and skillful”) to effectively communicate its positioning in an instant. The new name communicated a similar concept but on a completely different level. Callidus positions the software product correctly.

A brand is a company’s face to the world. It is the company’s name, how that name is visually expressed through a logo, and how that name and logo are extended throughout an organization’s communications. A brand is also how the company is perceived by its customers — the associations and inherent value they place on your business.

A brand is a kind of promise. It is a set of fundamental principles as understood by anyone who comes into contact with a company. A brand is an organization’s reason for being and how that reason is expressed through its various communications media to its key audiences, including customers, shareholders, employees and analysts. A brand can also describe these same attributes for a company’s products, services, and initiatives.

Apple’s brand is a great example. The Apple logo is clean, elegant, and easily implemented. At a certain point in time the company began to use the apple logo monochromatically (as opposed to the rainbow stripes), signaling a new era for Apple. Smart branding allowed the company to clearly communicate a change in direction while continuing to build its reputation. Think about how you’ve seen the brand in advertising, trade shows, packaging, and product design. It’s distinctive and it all adds up to a particular promise: quality of design and ease of use.

Checklist: Branding Right

By AllBusiness.com

Branding means that you have created a consciousness, an image, an awareness of your business. Here are five ways to start achieving that:

— Think analytically. A brand should provide something that warrants attention on a consistent basis, something your audience wants and is not getting from your competitors.

— Maintain your brand. One rule of thumb is that when you start to become tired of your logo, tagline, and branding efforts, that’s most likely when they are sinking in with customers.

— Don’t try to appeal to everyone. Typically, the best you can do is to focus on the niche market for your product.

— Know who you really are. Know your strengths and weaknesses through honest analysis of what you do best.

— Fully commit to branding. Treat all functions of the company, from product development to sales, as integral aspects of your brand.



The Lean Startup

New Products are Built and Launched

Philosophy Helps Start-Ups Move Faster Best business to start

Offers new ways to cut work time and investment Best business to start

Many CEOs have fully embraced and continue to internalize the lean startup principles Best business to start

Concepts apply both to designing products and to developing a market Best business to start

Sign up for the Lean Startup Newsletter

Get updates and exclusive content direct from Eric Ries

Benefits of The Lean Startup

Be more innovative.

Stop wasting people’s time.

Be more successful.

Lean Startup isn’t about being cheap [but is about] being less wasteful and still doing things that are big.

Principles of The Lean Startup

Lean Startups can operate with much less waste

The Lean Startup isn’t just about how to create a more successful entrepreneurial business. it’s about what we can learn from those businesses to improve virtually everything we do. I imagine Lean Startup principles applied to government programs, to healthcare, and to solving the world’s great problems. It’s ultimately an answer to the question ‘How can we learn more quickly what works, and discard what doesn’t? Tim O’Reilly CEO O’Reilly Media

Lean Startup Case Studies

  • Best business to start
  • Best business to start
  • Best business to start
  • Best business to start
  • Best business to start
  • Best business to start

Best business to start

Best business to start

Dropbox revolutionized file-sharing by making an extremely easy-to-use, seamless application. Learn More

Best business to start

Best business to start

Wealthfront is democratizing access to outstanding investment managers. Learn More

Best business to start

Best business to start

Grockit was founded in 2007 to enable social learning, specifically test preparation (SAT, LSAT, etc). Learn More

Best business to start

Best business to start

Founded in 2004, IMVU is the world’s largest 3D chat and dress-up community. Learn More

Best business to start

Best business to start

Votizen is disrupting how our government and politics works by putting focus back on individual voter. Learn More

Best business to start

Best business to start

Aardvark, a company subsequently acquired by Google, developed a social search engine. Learn More

Meet-ups are happening everywhere

  • Best business to start
  • Best business to start
  • Best business to start
  • Best business to start
  • Best business to start
  • Best business to start
  • Best business to start
  • Best business to start
  • Best business to start
  • Best business to start
  • Best business to start
  • Best business to start

Get the Lean

Why get the book?

Do one important thing: make better, faster business decisions. Vastly better, faster business decisions. Bringing principles from lean manufacturing and agile development to the process of innovation, the Lean Startup helps companies succeed in a business landscape riddled with risk.

This book shows you how.

Best business to start

About the Author

Eric Ries

Eric Ries is an entrepreneur and author of the New York Times bestseller



Geachte bezoeker,

Start.be heeft eindelijk zijn nieuwe eigenaar. Heeft u suggesties of opmerkingen dan horen wij dat graag.

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what business to start

What business to start

Imagine a life where all your time is spent on the things you want to do.

Imagine handing a letter to your boss that reads, “Dear Boss, I’m writing to let you know that your services are no longer required. Thanks for everything, but I’ll be doing things my own way now.”

Imagine that today is your final day of working for anyone other than yourself. What if—very soon, not in some distant, undefined future—you prepare for work by firing up a laptop in your home office, walking into a storefront you’ve opened, phoning a client who trusts you for helpful advice, or otherwise doing what you want instead of what someone tells you to do?

All over the world, and in many different ways, thousands of people are doing exactly that. They are rewriting the rules of work, becoming their own bosses, and creating a new future.

What business to start

In The $100 Startup, Chris Guillebeau shows you how to lead a life of adventure, meaning and purpose — and earn a good living.

Still in his early thirties, Chris is on the verge of completing a tour of every country on earth — he s already visited more than 175 nations — and yet he s never held a real job or earned a regular paycheck. Rather, he has a special genius for turning ideas into income, and he uses what he earns both to support his life of adventure and to give back.

There are many others like Chris — those who ve found ways to opt out of traditional employment and create the time and income to pursue what they find meaningful. Sometimes, achieving that perfect blend of passion and income doesn t depend on shelving what you currently do. You can start small with your venture, committing little time or money, and wait to take the real plunge when you re sure it s successful.

In preparing to write this book, Chris identified 1,500 individuals who have built businesses earning $50,000 or more from a modest investment (in many cases, $100 or less), and from that group he s chosen to focus on the 50 most intriguing case studies. In nearly all cases, people with no special skills discovered aspects of their personal passions that could be monetized, and were able to restructure their lives in ways that gave them greater freedom and fulfillment.

Here, finally, distilled into one easy-to-use guide, are the most valuable lessons from those who ve learned how to turn what they do into a gateway to self-fulfillment. It s all about finding the intersection between your expertise — even if you don t consider it such — and what other people will pay for.

You don t need an MBA, a business plan or even employees. All you need is a product or service that springs from what you love to do anyway, people willing to pay, and a way to get paid

Not content to talk in generalities, Chris tells you exactly how many dollars his group of unexpected entrepreneurs required to get their projects up and running; what these individuals did in the first weeks and months to generate significant cash; some of the key mistakes they made along the way, and the crucial insights that made the business stick. Among Chris s key principles: if you re good at one thing, you re probably good at something else; never teach a man to fish — sell him the fish instead; and in the battle between planning and action, action wins.

In ancient times, people who were dissatisfied with their lives dreamed of finding magic lamps, buried treasure, or streets paved with gold. Today, we know that it s up to us to change our lives. And the best part is, if we change our own life, we can help others change theirs. This remarkable book will start you on your way.

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You ll need the latest version of Acrobat Reader to open and view these PDF files.

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Our partner site, UnconventionalGuides.com, offers additional paid resources.

If you re looking to set up your first (or your tenth!) website, InMotion is easy and cheap. They ve agreed to offer a 50% off discount for all $100 Startup readers.

Starting in New York City and going to the ends of the earth, we ll be hitting all 7 continents with the message of The $100 Startup.

Chris is currently on tour hiatus while preparing for the World Domination Summit and completing a new book. More tour dates will be coming later this year!

If you represent a group, organization, or bookstore, you can also suggest a future tour stop.

You can see dates of previous stops on the list at the right or the map at the bottom.



The New York Times

What business to start

Graphic | A Long Start-Up Slump

September 20, 2017

Unemployment has fallen, and the stock market has soared. So why has the economic expansion since the recession been so tame, with sluggish productivity and, at least until recently, anemic wage growth?

Economists say the answer, to some degree, can be found in a start-up slump — a decline in the creation of new businesses — and a growing understanding of what’s behind it.

A total of 414,000 businesses were formed in 2015, the latest year surveyed, the Census Bureau reported Wednesday. It was a slight increase from the previous year, but well below the 558,000 companies given birth in 2006, the year before the recession set in.

“We’re still in a start-up funk,” said Robert Litan, an economist and antitrust lawyer who has studied the issue. “Obviously the recession had a lot to do with it, but then you’re left with the conundrum: Why hasn’t there been any recovery?”

Many economists say the answer could lie in the rising power of the biggest corporations, which they argue is stifling entrepreneurship by making it easier for incumbent businesses to swat away challengers — or else to swallow them before they become a serious threat.

“You’ve got rising market power,” said Marshall Steinbaum, an economist at the Roosevelt Institute, a liberal think tank. “In general, that makes it hard for new businesses to compete with incumbents. Market power is the story that explains everything.”

That argument comes at a potent political moment. Populists on both the left and right have responded to growing public unease about the corporate giants that increasingly dominate their online and offline lives. Polling data from Gallup and other organizations shows a long-running decline in confidence in banks and other big businesses — a concern not likely to abate after high-profile data breaches at Equifax and other companies.

The start-up slump has far-reaching implications. Small businesses in general are often cited as an exemplar of economic dynamism. But it is start-ups — and particularly the small subset of companies that grow quickly — that are key drivers of job creation and innovation, and have historically been a ladder into the middle class for less-educated workers and immigrants.

Perhaps most significant, start-ups play a critical role in making the economy as a whole more productive, as they invent new products and approaches, forcing existing businesses to compete or fall by the wayside.

“Across the decades, young companies are really the heavy hitters and the consistent hitters in terms of job creation,” said Arnobio Morelix, an economist at the Kauffman Foundation, a nonprofit in Kansas City, Mo., that studies and promotes entrepreneurship.

The start-up decline might defy expectations in the age of Uber and “Shark Tank.” But however counterintuitive, the trend is backed by multiple data sources and numerous economic studies.

In 1980, according to the Census Bureau data, roughly one in eight companies had been founded in the past year; by 2015, that ratio had fallen to fewer than one in 12. The downward trend cuts across regions and industries and, at least since 2000, includes even the beating heart of American entrepreneurship, high tech.

Although the overall slump dates back more than 30 years, economists are most concerned about a more recent trend. In the 1980s and 1990s, the entrepreneurial slowdown was concentrated in sectors such as retail, where corner stores and regional brands were being subsumed by national chains. That trend, though often painful for local communities, wasn’t necessarily a drag on productivity more generally.

Since about 2000, however, the slowdown has spread to parts of the economy more often associated with high-growth entrepreneurship, including the technology sector. That decline has coincided with a period of weak productivity growth in the United States as a whole, a trend that has in turn been implicated in the patterns of fitful wage gains and sluggish economic growth since the recession. Recent research has suggested that the decline in entrepreneurship, and in other measures of business dynamism, is one cause of the prolonged stagnation in productivity.

“We’ve got lots of pieces now that say dynamism has gone down a lot since 2000,” said John Haltiwanger, a University of Maryland economist who has done much of the pioneering work in the field. “Start-ups have gone down a lot since 2000, especially in the high-tech sectors, and there are increasingly strong links to productivity.”

What is behind the decline in entrepreneurship is less clear. Economists and other experts have pointed to a range of possible explanations: The aging of the baby-boom generation has left fewer Americans in their prime business-starting years. The decline of community banks and the collapse of the market for home-equity loans may have made it harder for would-be entrepreneurs to get access to capital. Increased regulation, at both the state and federal levels, may be particularly burdensome for new businesses that lack well-staffed compliance departments. Those and other factors could well play a role, but none can fully explain the decline.

More recently, economists — especially but not exclusively on the left — have begun pointing the finger at big business, and in particular at the handful of companies that increasingly dominate many industries.

What business to start

Graphic | Big Business, Getting Bigger The share of employees working at large, medium and small companies in the United States.

The evidence is largely circumstantial: The slump in entrepreneurship has coincided with a period of increasing concentration in nearly every major industry. Research from Mr. Haltiwanger and several co-authors has found that the most productive companies are growing more slowly than in the past, a hint that competitive pressures aren’t forcing companies to react as quickly to new innovations.

A recent working paper from economists at Princeton and University College London found that American companies are increasingly able to demand prices well above their costs — which according to standard economic theory would lead new companies to enter the market. Yet that isn’t happening.

“If we’re in an era of excessive profits, in competitive markets we would see record firm entry, but we see the opposite,” said Ian Hathaway, an economist who has studied the issue. That, Mr. Hathaway said, suggests that the market is not truly competitive — that existing companies have found ways to block competitors.

Experts also point to anecdotal examples that suggest that the rise of big businesses could be squelching competition. YouTube, Instagram and hundreds of lower-profile start-ups chose to sell out to industry heavyweights like Google and Facebook rather than try to take them on directly. The tech giants have likewise been accused of using the power of their platforms to favor their own offerings over those of competitors.

Most recently, Amazon openly called for a bidding war among cities for its second headquarters — hardly the kind of demand a new start-up could make. Mr. Morelix said the Amazon example was particularly striking.

“We’re saying that it’s O.K. that they shape how a city charges taxes?” Mr. Morelix said. “And what kind of regulations they have? That should be terrifying to anyone that wants a free market.”

In Washington, where for years politicians have praised small businesses while catering to big ones, issues of competition and entrepreneurship are increasingly drawing bipartisan attention. Several Republican presidential candidates referred to the start-up slump during last year’s primary campaign. Progressive Democrats such as Senators Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts and Amy Klobuchar of Minnesota have pushed for stricter enforcement of antitrust rules. In a speech in March, Ms. Klobuchar explicitly tied the struggles of entrepreneurs to rising corporate concentration.

In July, entrepreneurs achieved a mark of political relevance: their own advocacy group. The newly formed Center for American Entrepreneurship will conduct research on the importance of new businesses to the economy and push for policies aimed at improving the start-up rate. Its founding president, John Dearie, comes from big business — he was most recently the acting head of the Financial Services Forum, which represents big financial institutions.

“Everybody loves entrepreneurship, but they’re not aware it’s in trouble,” Mr. Dearie said. “If new businesses are the engine of net new job creation, and if new businesses are the engine of innovation, and new business creation is at 30-year lows, that’s a national emergency.”

Follow Ben Casselman on Twitter: @bencasselman



The New York Times

Businesses to start

Graphic | A Long Start-Up Slump

September 20, 2017

Unemployment has fallen, and the stock market has soared. So why has the economic expansion since the recession been so tame, with sluggish productivity and, at least until recently, anemic wage growth?

Economists say the answer, to some degree, can be found in a start-up slump — a decline in the creation of new businesses — and a growing understanding of what’s behind it.

A total of 414,000 businesses were formed in 2015, the latest year surveyed, the Census Bureau reported Wednesday. It was a slight increase from the previous year, but well below the 558,000 companies given birth in 2006, the year before the recession set in.

“We’re still in a start-up funk,” said Robert Litan, an economist and antitrust lawyer who has studied the issue. “Obviously the recession had a lot to do with it, but then you’re left with the conundrum: Why hasn’t there been any recovery?”

Many economists say the answer could lie in the rising power of the biggest corporations, which they argue is stifling entrepreneurship by making it easier for incumbent businesses to swat away challengers — or else to swallow them before they become a serious threat.

“You’ve got rising market power,” said Marshall Steinbaum, an economist at the Roosevelt Institute, a liberal think tank. “In general, that makes it hard for new businesses to compete with incumbents. Market power is the story that explains everything.”

That argument comes at a potent political moment. Populists on both the left and right have responded to growing public unease about the corporate giants that increasingly dominate their online and offline lives. Polling data from Gallup and other organizations shows a long-running decline in confidence in banks and other big businesses — a concern not likely to abate after high-profile data breaches at Equifax and other companies.

The start-up slump has far-reaching implications. Small businesses in general are often cited as an exemplar of economic dynamism. But it is start-ups — and particularly the small subset of companies that grow quickly — that are key drivers of job creation and innovation, and have historically been a ladder into the middle class for less-educated workers and immigrants.

Perhaps most significant, start-ups play a critical role in making the economy as a whole more productive, as they invent new products and approaches, forcing existing businesses to compete or fall by the wayside.

“Across the decades, young companies are really the heavy hitters and the consistent hitters in terms of job creation,” said Arnobio Morelix, an economist at the Kauffman Foundation, a nonprofit in Kansas City, Mo., that studies and promotes entrepreneurship.

The start-up decline might defy expectations in the age of Uber and “Shark Tank.” But however counterintuitive, the trend is backed by multiple data sources and numerous economic studies.

In 1980, according to the Census Bureau data, roughly one in eight companies had been founded in the past year; by 2015, that ratio had fallen to fewer than one in 12. The downward trend cuts across regions and industries and, at least since 2000, includes even the beating heart of American entrepreneurship, high tech.

Although the overall slump dates back more than 30 years, economists are most concerned about a more recent trend. In the 1980s and 1990s, the entrepreneurial slowdown was concentrated in sectors such as retail, where corner stores and regional brands were being subsumed by national chains. That trend, though often painful for local communities, wasn’t necessarily a drag on productivity more generally.

Since about 2000, however, the slowdown has spread to parts of the economy more often associated with high-growth entrepreneurship, including the technology sector. That decline has coincided with a period of weak productivity growth in the United States as a whole, a trend that has in turn been implicated in the patterns of fitful wage gains and sluggish economic growth since the recession. Recent research has suggested that the decline in entrepreneurship, and in other measures of business dynamism, is one cause of the prolonged stagnation in productivity.

“We’ve got lots of pieces now that say dynamism has gone down a lot since 2000,” said John Haltiwanger, a University of Maryland economist who has done much of the pioneering work in the field. “Start-ups have gone down a lot since 2000, especially in the high-tech sectors, and there are increasingly strong links to productivity.”

What is behind the decline in entrepreneurship is less clear. Economists and other experts have pointed to a range of possible explanations: The aging of the baby-boom generation has left fewer Americans in their prime business-starting years. The decline of community banks and the collapse of the market for home-equity loans may have made it harder for would-be entrepreneurs to get access to capital. Increased regulation, at both the state and federal levels, may be particularly burdensome for new businesses that lack well-staffed compliance departments. Those and other factors could well play a role, but none can fully explain the decline.

More recently, economists — especially but not exclusively on the left — have begun pointing the finger at big business, and in particular at the handful of companies that increasingly dominate many industries.

Businesses to start

Graphic | Big Business, Getting Bigger The share of employees working at large, medium and small companies in the United States.

The evidence is largely circumstantial: The slump in entrepreneurship has coincided with a period of increasing concentration in nearly every major industry. Research from Mr. Haltiwanger and several co-authors has found that the most productive companies are growing more slowly than in the past, a hint that competitive pressures aren’t forcing companies to react as quickly to new innovations.

A recent working paper from economists at Princeton and University College London found that American companies are increasingly able to demand prices well above their costs — which according to standard economic theory would lead new companies to enter the market. Yet that isn’t happening.

“If we’re in an era of excessive profits, in competitive markets we would see record firm entry, but we see the opposite,” said Ian Hathaway, an economist who has studied the issue. That, Mr. Hathaway said, suggests that the market is not truly competitive — that existing companies have found ways to block competitors.

Experts also point to anecdotal examples that suggest that the rise of big businesses could be squelching competition. YouTube, Instagram and hundreds of lower-profile start-ups chose to sell out to industry heavyweights like Google and Facebook rather than try to take them on directly. The tech giants have likewise been accused of using the power of their platforms to favor their own offerings over those of competitors.

Most recently, Amazon openly called for a bidding war among cities for its second headquarters — hardly the kind of demand a new start-up could make. Mr. Morelix said the Amazon example was particularly striking.

“We’re saying that it’s O.K. that they shape how a city charges taxes?” Mr. Morelix said. “And what kind of regulations they have? That should be terrifying to anyone that wants a free market.”

In Washington, where for years politicians have praised small businesses while catering to big ones, issues of competition and entrepreneurship are increasingly drawing bipartisan attention. Several Republican presidential candidates referred to the start-up slump during last year’s primary campaign. Progressive Democrats such as Senators Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts and Amy Klobuchar of Minnesota have pushed for stricter enforcement of antitrust rules. In a speech in March, Ms. Klobuchar explicitly tied the struggles of entrepreneurs to rising corporate concentration.

In July, entrepreneurs achieved a mark of political relevance: their own advocacy group. The newly formed Center for American Entrepreneurship will conduct research on the importance of new businesses to the economy and push for policies aimed at improving the start-up rate. Its founding president, John Dearie, comes from big business — he was most recently the acting head of the Financial Services Forum, which represents big financial institutions.

“Everybody loves entrepreneurship, but they’re not aware it’s in trouble,” Mr. Dearie said. “If new businesses are the engine of net new job creation, and if new businesses are the engine of innovation, and new business creation is at 30-year lows, that’s a national emergency.”

Follow Ben Casselman on Twitter: @bencasselman



The Lean Startup

New Products are Built and Launched

Philosophy Helps Start-Ups Move Faster Businesses to start

Offers new ways to cut work time and investment Businesses to start

Many CEOs have fully embraced and continue to internalize the lean startup principles Businesses to start

Concepts apply both to designing products and to developing a market Businesses to start

Sign up for the Lean Startup Newsletter

Get updates and exclusive content direct from Eric Ries

Benefits of The Lean Startup

Be more innovative.

Stop wasting people’s time.

Be more successful.

Lean Startup isn’t about being cheap [but is about] being less wasteful and still doing things that are big.

Principles of The Lean Startup

Lean Startups can operate with much less waste

The Lean Startup isn’t just about how to create a more successful entrepreneurial business. it’s about what we can learn from those businesses to improve virtually everything we do. I imagine Lean Startup principles applied to government programs, to healthcare, and to solving the world’s great problems. It’s ultimately an answer to the question ‘How can we learn more quickly what works, and discard what doesn’t? Tim O’Reilly CEO O’Reilly Media

Lean Startup Case Studies

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Dropbox revolutionized file-sharing by making an extremely easy-to-use, seamless application. Learn More

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Wealthfront is democratizing access to outstanding investment managers. Learn More

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Businesses to start

Grockit was founded in 2007 to enable social learning, specifically test preparation (SAT, LSAT, etc). Learn More

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Businesses to start

Founded in 2004, IMVU is the world’s largest 3D chat and dress-up community. Learn More

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Businesses to start

Votizen is disrupting how our government and politics works by putting focus back on individual voter. Learn More

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Businesses to start

Aardvark, a company subsequently acquired by Google, developed a social search engine. Learn More

Meet-ups are happening everywhere

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Get the Lean

Why get the book?

Do one important thing: make better, faster business decisions. Vastly better, faster business decisions. Bringing principles from lean manufacturing and agile development to the process of innovation, the Lean Startup helps companies succeed in a business landscape riddled with risk.

This book shows you how.

Businesses to start

About the Author

Eric Ries

Eric Ries is an entrepreneur and author of the New York Times bestseller



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X Autoplay: On | Off Stay on top of the latest news, trends and stocks to watch across a wide range of industries, including banks and finance, airlines, energy, retail, biotech, semiconductors and more.

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This Chinese E-Commerce Giant Had A Huge ‘11.11’ — And So Did Alibaba

1:56 PM ET Alibaba led the pack on 11.11, aka Singles Day, but JD.com also had a big shopping day. Tencent-backed JD.com will.

1:56 PM ET Alibaba led the pack on 11.11, aka Singles Day, but.

Roku, Snap, Sogou: 3 Different IPOs, 1 Investing Strategy
Battleship Plus Barbie: Hasbro Reportedly Makes Buyout Offer For Mattel
Netflix Stock Retreats On Disney Competitive Threat
Here’s What To Expect When China Internet Giant JD.com Reports Earnings
Roku Stock Breaks Out On Post-Earnings-Report Fervor
Stocks Close Mixed As This Company Logs $5.4 Billion In Sales In 10 Minutes
What Do Amazon, Netflix, BofA See In This Potential Breakout Stock?
As GE’s Moment Of Truth Nears, Look For Answers To These 4 Questions

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See which stocks just got an upgrade and now have a 95 or higher IBD Composite Rating.

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