Women in business

Women in business

GIFTS THAT GIVE BACK

Give a gift that helps a woman survivor of war.

Your gift will help a woman in need rebuild her life and spread the goodwill of the season to your loved ones.

2017 Luncheon

Women in business

SUPPORTING REFUGEES

Women in business

Celebrity Spotlight: Sophie Turner

Women in business

LEARN MORE

Women in business

Women in business

Women in business

Women in business

My name is Regina

Since joining Women for Women International, Regina has been working to improve the health of those in her community.

Women in business

My Name Is Awham

Awham remembers the year the war started in Iraq, and the additional hardships she faced after her husband fell ill and lost his job. “I was left to care for my four children with no income.

Women in business

My name is Zarghuna

I am 38 years old. There was no happiness in my childhood. When I was six years old, my brother lost a dog-fighting match and started fighting with my cousin which led to my cousin’s death.

Women in business

My name is Nabintu

I was a happy woman, wife, and mother before the war came to my front door. After high school, I wanted to earn some money and explore the city so I went to be a babysitter for a family in Bukavu.

Women in business

My Name is Caritas

I’m 39 years old. I’m married and I have two children of my own, a son and a daughter. And I have adopted five more children, because of the genocide.



Women in business

Women in business

GIFTS THAT GIVE BACK

Give a gift that helps a woman survivor of war.

Your gift will help a woman in need rebuild her life and spread the goodwill of the season to your loved ones.

2017 Luncheon

Women in business

SUPPORTING REFUGEES

Women in business

Celebrity Spotlight: Sophie Turner

Women in business

LEARN MORE

Women in business

Women in business

Women in business

Women in business

My name is Regina

Since joining Women for Women International, Regina has been working to improve the health of those in her community.

Women in business

My Name Is Awham

Awham remembers the year the war started in Iraq, and the additional hardships she faced after her husband fell ill and lost his job. “I was left to care for my four children with no income.

Women in business

My name is Zarghuna

I am 38 years old. There was no happiness in my childhood. When I was six years old, my brother lost a dog-fighting match and started fighting with my cousin which led to my cousin’s death.

Women in business

My name is Nabintu

I was a happy woman, wife, and mother before the war came to my front door. After high school, I wanted to earn some money and explore the city so I went to be a babysitter for a family in Bukavu.

Women in business

My Name is Caritas

I’m 39 years old. I’m married and I have two children of my own, a son and a daughter. And I have adopted five more children, because of the genocide.



The Complete Beginner’s Guide to Investing in Stock

History has shown that investing in stocks is one of the easiest and most profitable ways to build wealth over the long-term. With a handful of notable exceptions, almost every member of the Forbes 400 list got there because they own a large block of shares in a public or private corporation. Although your beginning may be humble, this guide to investing in stocks will explain what stocks are, how you can make money from them, and much more.

Investing in stocks

Have you ever asked yourself, What is stock? or wondered why shares of stock exist? This introduction to the world of investing in stocks will provide answers to those questions and show you just how simple Wall Street really is. It may turn out to be one of the most important articles you ve ever read if you don t understand what stocks represent. Find out the answer to What is Stock? and how it comes to exist . More

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How Do I Actually Make Money from Investing in Stocks?

Investing in stocks

You probably know that investing in stocks is a way to get rich but very few new investors actually realize how you make money from your shares of stock. Now, you don t have to wonder any longer. Let us show you the two ways you can profit from owning and investing in stocks, and some of the factors that determine how fast a company grows. Find out how to make money from owning stocks . More

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How to Invest in Stocks

Investing in stocks

Once you ve come up with a list of potential stock investments, you need to actually jump in and start buying shares. How do you do it? It s not hard at all. Let us show you how to invest in stocks . More

How Can I Find Stocks for My Portfolio?

Investing in stocks

Now that you understand the basics of investing in stocks, the next step is to find investment ideas. You need the names of actual companies in which you want to purchase stock. How can you find good investment ideas? Here are some suggestions . More

Continue to 5 of 12 below.

Ready to start building wealth? Sign up today to learn how to save for an early retirement, tackle your debt, and grow your net worth.

Why Do Stock Prices Fluctuate?

Investing in stocks

When you own shares of stock, you better get used to your portfolio going up 50% or falling 50% over short periods of time. What, exactly, makes shares of stock fluctuate so much? The answer is really simple . More

What Is a Stock Split?

Investing in stocks

If you invest in stock, you are going to experience a stock split at one time or another. What is a stock split? Are stock splits good or bad for you? Find out what stock splits do to your investments . More

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What Is a Stock’s Market Capitalization (and Why Should I Care)?

Investing in stocks

Once you begin investing in stock, you need to pay close attention to the market capitalization of each stock you own. Terms such as mega cap, big cap, small cap, and micro cap may not make sense to you now, but in a few moments, it will be old hat. Find out more about how market capitalization influences your investment returns . More

What You Should Know About Stock Prices

Investing in stocks

Did you know a $50 stock can be more expensive than an $800 stock? It has to do with the way corporations are structured and as a new investor, this is one of the most important things you need to learn before you invest a single dollar into the stock market. Find out how you should think about share price . More

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Dividends 101

Investing in stocks

Studies have shown that 99% of the real, after-inflation return you earn on your stock investments will come from the dividends you receive each year. This guide covers everything a new stock investor needs to know about dividends including how they are paid, and much more. More

Should I Invest In Blue Chip Stocks?

Investing in stocks

Now that you are an investor, you are going to hear a lot about blue chip stocks, or bellwethers as they were called in the old days. How is investing in blue chip stocks different, and why would you consider adding them to your portfolio? Discover the benefits of blue chip stocks . More

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How Is Investing in Preferred Stock Different from Investing in Stock?

Investing in stocks

Preferred stock is very different from regular shares of common stock that virtually all investors have owned at one time or another. In fact, preferred stocks have their own list of risks and drawbacks. Find out how investing in preferred stocks is different . More

How To Choose a Stock Broker for Your Stocks

Investing in stocks

It s difficult to begin investing in stocks without a stock broker. This complete guide to choosing a stock broker and brokerage firm should make the process easy and enjoyable. More



Women s Business Loans

A recent Forbes article, The Confidence Gap and Women Entrepreneurs, restated what is widely known in the industry: Women have less access to money for business than their male counterparts.

This means that fewer women are approved to borrow money from traditional lenders and that most women owned businesses are undercapitalized. WVF’s goal is to address this confidence and skills gap so women understand what it takes to successfully access credit.

Women s Venture Fund offers a more flexible approach to assessing your credit needs. Since many of our clients are first time entrepreneurs,

we help you calculate your loan needs through our consultation process. This approach helps the entrepreneur understand how much financing is needed and what additional steps are needed to achieve true profitability.

WVF funds women owned businesses based on sales, number of clients, contracts and the availability of other accessible resources to support the amount requested. The process starts with your written plan that shows how you secure clients and based on your track record, what you project as future sales. Tell us how you will build on your current success and we will help you assess how much you need to achieve your vision for growth. Show us your determination and your plans to grow and we will help you chart the best path to get there.

Often times it s not just a loan that is required to grow. We can help you develop the best comprehensive roadmap for organizational growth via our advisory program.

Currently, WVF is working with clients in the New York City metropolitan area. If you currently own a business in this region, we can get the process started. Simply send us your record of success to date along with the application below. We can schedule a call to discuss what’s feasible after that.

Not sure how to develop a growth action plan? See our schedule of workshops focused on helping clients seeking assistance in generating their plans and revenue projections.



BusinessEthics.ca

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Ethics in business

Chris MacDonald, Ph.D.

Ethics in business

Cases :

Collections of Cases:

Ethics in business Business Ethics Case Studies from the Business Roundtable Institute for Corporate Ethics

Ethics in business Case Studies from the e-Center for Business Ethics

Ethics in business A wide range of business cases, including many related to ethics: European Case Clearing House

  • Ethics in businessBusiness Ethics Cases from Santa Clara University

  • Ethics in businessArthur Andersen Case Studies in Business Ethics from the Tepper School of Business

  • Ethics in businessCorporate scandals from Wikipedia
  • Individual Cases Mini-Cases:

    Ethics in business Whistleblowing the Environment: The Case of Avco Environmental (mini-case from BusinessEthics.ca)

    Ethics in business The Polluter’s Dilemma (mini-case from BusinessEthics.ca)

    Ethics in business e-Health and Commercial Genetic Testing (mini-case from BusinessEthics.ca)

    Ethics in business



    Getting Started In Stocks

    So you’ve decided to invest in the stock market. Congratulations! In his 2005 book “The Future for Investors,” Jeremy Siegel showed that, in the long run, investing in stocks has handily outperformed investing in bonds, Treasury bills, gold or cash. In the short term, one or another asset may outperform stocks, but overall stocks have historically been the winning path.

    More from Investopedia:

    But there are so many ways to invest in stocks. Individual stocks, mutual funds, index funds, ETFs, domestic, foreign – how can you decide what is right for you? This article will address several issues that you, as a new (or not-so-new) investor, might want to consider so that you can rest more easily while letting your money grow.

    Risk Taker, Risk Averse or in the Middle?

    You may be eager to get started so that you, too, can make those fabulous returns you hear so much about, but slow down and take a moment to contemplate some simple questions. The time spent now to consider the following will save you money down the road.

    What kind of person are you? Are you a risk taker, willing to throw money at a chance to make a lot of money or would you prefer a more “sure” thing? What would be your likely response to a 10% drop in a single stock in one day or a 35% drop over the course of a few weeks? Would you sell it all in a panic?

    The answers to these and similar questions will lead you to consider different types of equity investments, such as mutual or index funds versus individual stocks. If you are naturally not someone to take risks, and feel uncomfortable doing so but still want to invest in stocks, the best bet for you might be mutual funds or index funds. This is because they are well diversified and contain many different stocks. This reduces risk – and doesn’t require individual stock research.

    How much time and interest do you have for investing?

    Should you invest in funds, stocks or both? The answer depends on how much time you wish to devote to this endeavor. Careful selection of mutual or index funds would let you invest your money, leaving the hard work of picking stocks to the fund manager. Index funds are even simpler in that they move up or down according to the type of company, industry or market they are designed to track.

    Individual stock investing is the most time consuming as it requires you to make judgments about management, earnings and future prospects. As an investor, you are attempting to distinguish between a money-making stock and financial disaster. You need to know what they do, how they make their money, the risks, the future prospects and much more.

    Therefore, ask yourself how much time you have to devote to this enterprise. Are you willing to spend a couple of hours a week, or more, reading about different companies, or is your life just too busy to carve out that time? Investing in individual stocks is a skill, which, like any other, takes time to develop.

    It is best that you not be exposed to only one type of asset. For instance, don’t put all of your money in small biotech companies. Yes, the potential gain can be quite high, but what will happen to your investment if the Food and Drug Administration starts rejecting a higher percentage of new drugs? Your entire portfolio would be negatively impacted.

    It is better to be diversified across several different sectors such as real estate (a real estate investment trust is one possibility), consumer goods, commodities, insurance, etc., rather than focusing on one or two or three, as above. Consider diversifying across asset classes, as well, by keeping some money in bonds and cash, rather than being 100% invested in stocks. How much to have in these different sectors and classes is up to you, but being invested more broadly lessens the risk of losing it all at any one time.

    A Portfolio for Beginners

    If you are just starting out, think seriously about investing most of your money in a couple of index funds, such as one tracking the broad market (e.g. the S ?>


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    Investing in stocks

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    Scottrade, Inc. and Scottrade Bank are separate but affiliated companies and are wholly owned subsidiaries of Scottrade Financial Services, Inc. Brokerage Products and Services offered by Scottrade, Inc. – Member FINRA and SIPC. Deposit products and services offered by Scottrade Bank, Member FDIC.

    Investing in stocks

    Brokerage products and services offered by Scottrade, Inc. – Member FINRA and SIPC.

    Brokerage products are not insured by the FDIC — are not deposits or other obligations of the Bank and are not guaranteed by the Bank — are subject to investment risks, including possible loss of the principal invested.

    Investors should consider the investment objectives, charges, expense, and unique risk profile of an exchange-traded fund (ETF) before investing. A prospectus contains this and other information about the fund and may be obtained online or by contacting Scottrade. The prospectus should be read carefully before investing.

    Options involve risk and are not suitable for all investors. Detailed information on our policies and the risks associated with options can be found in the Scottrade ® Options Application and Agreement, Brokerage Account Agreement, by downloading the Characteristics and Risks of Standardized Options and Supplements (PDF) from The Options Clearing Corporation, or by requesting a copy by contacting Scottrade. Supporting documentation for any claims will be supplied upon request. Consult with your tax advisor for information on how taxes may affect the outcome of these strategies. Keep in mind, profit will be reduced or loss worsened, as applicable, by the deduction of commissions and fees.

    All investing involves risk. The value of your investment may fluctuate over time, and you may gain or lose money.

    Scottrade ® , the Scottrade ® logo and all other trademarks, whether registered or unregistered, are the property of TD Ameritrade IP Company, Inc. All rights reserved. Used with permission.



    Business Ethics and Social Responsibility

    Also See the Library’s Blog Related to Ethics and Social Responsibility

    In addition to the articles on this current page, also see the following blog that has posts related to Ethics and Social Responsibility. Scan down the blog’s page to see various posts. Also see the section Recent Blog Posts in the sidebar of the blog or click on next near the bottom of a post in the blog. The blog also links to numerous free related resources.

    About Ethics, Principles and Moral Values

    Simply put, ethics involves learning what is right or wrong, and then doing the right thing — but the right thing is not nearly as straightforward as conveyed in a great deal of business ethics literature. Most ethical dilemmas in the workplace are not simply a matter of Should Bob steal from Jack? or Should Jack lie to his boss?

    (Many ethicists assert there’s always a right thing to do based on moral principle, and others believe the right thing to do depends on the situation — ultimately it’s up to the individual.) Many philosophers consider ethics to be the science of conduct. Twin Cities consultants Doug Wallace and John Pekel (of the Twin Cities-based Fulcrum Group; 651-714-9033; e-mail at [email protected]) explain that ethics includes the fundamental ground rules by which we live our lives. Philosophers have been discussing ethics for at least 2500 years, since the time of Socrates and Plato. Many ethicists consider emerging ethical beliefs to be state of the art legal matters, i.e., what becomes an ethical guideline today is often translated to a law, regulation or rule tomorrow. Values which guide how we ought to behave are considered moral values, e.g., values such as respect, honesty, fairness, responsibility, etc. Statements around how these values are applied are sometimes called moral or ethical principles. (Extracted from Complete (Practical) Guide to Managing Ethics in the Workplace.)

    What is Business Ethics?

    The concept has come to mean various things to various people, but generally it’s coming to know what it right or wrong in the workplace and doing what’s right — this is in regard to effects of products/services and in relationships with stakeholders. Wallace and Pekel explain that attention to business ethics is critical during times of fundamental change — times much like those faced now by businesses, both nonprofit or for-profit. In times of fundamental change, values that were previously taken for granted are now strongly questioned. Many of these values are no longer followed. Consequently, there is no clear moral compass to guide leaders through complex dilemmas about what is right or wrong. Attention to ethics in the workplace sensitizes leaders and staff to how they should act. Perhaps most important, attention to ethics in the workplaces helps ensure that when leaders and managers are struggling in times of crises and confusion, they retain a strong moral compass. However, attention to business ethics provides numerous other benefits, as well (these benefits are listed later in this document).

    Note that many people react that business ethics, with its continuing attention to doing the right thing, only asserts the obvious ( be good, don’t lie, etc.), and so these people don’t take business ethics seriously. For many of us, these principles of the obvious can go right out the door during times of stress. Consequently, business ethics can be strong preventative medicine. Anyway, there are many other benefits of managing ethics in the workplace. These benefits are explained later in this document. (Extracted from Complete (Practical) Guide to Managing Ethics in the Workplace.)

    Managing Ethics in the Workplace

    Managing Ethics Programs in the Workplace

    Organizations can manage ethics in their workplaces by establishing an ethics management program. Brian Schrag, Executive Secretary of the Association for Practical and Professional Ethics, clarifies. Typically, ethics programs convey corporate values, often using codes and policies to guide decisions and behavior, and can include extensive training and evaluating, depending on the organization. They provide guidance in ethical dilemmas. Rarely are two programs alike.

    All organizations have ethics programs, but most do not know that they do, wrote business ethics professor Stephen Brenner in the Journal of Business Ethics (1992, V11, pp. 391-399). A corporate ethics program is made up of values, policies and activities which impact the propriety of organization behaviors.

    Bob Dunn, President and CEO of San Francisco-based Business for Social Responsibility, adds: Balancing competing values and reconciling them is a basic purpose of an ethics management program. Business people need more practical tools and information to understand their values and how to manage them. (Extracted from Complete (Practical) Guide to Managing Ethics in the Workplace.)

    Developing Codes of Ethics

    According to Wallace, A credo generally describes the highest values to which the company aspires to operate. It contains the `thou shalts.’ A code of ethics specifies the ethical rules of operation. It’s the `thou shalt nots. In the latter 1980s, The Conference Board, a leading business membership organization, found that 76% of corporations surveyed had codes of ethics.

    Some business ethicists disagree that codes have any value. Usually they explain that too much focus is put on the codes themselves, and that codes themselves are not influential in managing ethics in the workplace. Many ethicists note that it’s the developing and continuing dialogue around the code’s values that is most important. (Extracted from Complete (Practical) Guide to Managing Ethics in the Workplace.)

    Developing Codes of Conduct

    If your organization is quite large, e.g., includes several large programs or departments, you may want to develop an overall corporate code of ethics and then a separate code to guide each of your programs or departments. Codes should not be developed out of the Human Resource or Legal departments alone, as is too often done. Codes are insufficient if intended only to ensure that policies are legal. All staff must see the ethics program being driven by top management.

    Resolving Ethical Dilemmas and Making Ethical Decisions

    Perhaps too often, business ethics is portrayed as a matter of resolving conflicts in which one option appears to be the clear choice. For example, case studies are often presented in which an employee is faced with whether or not to lie, steal, cheat, abuse another, break terms of a contract, etc. However, ethical dilemmas faced by managers are often more real-to-life and highly complex with no clear guidelines, whether in law or often in religion.

    Assessing and Cultivating Ethical Culture

    Culture is comprised of the values, norms, folkways and behaviors of an organization. Ethics is about moral values, or values regarding right and wrong. Therefore, cultural assessments can be extremely valuable when assessing the moral values in an organization.

    Ethics Training

    The ethics program is essentially useless unless all staff members are trained about what it is, how it works and their roles in it. The nature of the system may invite suspicion if not handled openly and honestly. In addition, no matter how fair and up-to-date is a set of policies, the legal system will often interpret employee behavior (rather than written policies) as de facto policy. Therefore, all staff must be aware of and act in full accordance with policies and procedures (this is true, whether policies and procedures are for ethics programs or personnel management). This full accordance requires training about policies and procedures.



    Modern Healthcare

    The leader in healthcare business news, research data

    Women in business

    Unsure of CMS’ strategy, providers may retreat on risk models

    Providers fear that the CMS is sending mixed messages on regulatory relief on the shift to value-based care.

    ONC seeks comments on Interoperability Standards Advisory

    Women in business

    The 21st Century Cures Act tasked the Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology with a herculean task: solve the interoperability puzzle.

    Redesigning hospitals with patient experience in mind

    Women in business

    Hospital design is moving beyond cosmetic changes to please patients by adding features that give them more control.

    Research

    MASTERING MACRA: What you need to know about Medicare’s physician Quality Payment Program

    Women in business

    MACRA’s approach to reimbursing physicians is here, but many doctors and administrators are still trying to get a handle on how it works. Read on for tips on how to deal with this major change to the Medicare payment system.

    Data Points: Is it time to talk?

    Women in business

    Providers

    HCA’s East Houston Regional Medical Center unable to weather the storm

    HCA-owned East Houston Regional Medical Center will not reopen after the flood damage it sustained from Hurricane Harvey.

    Insurance

    HealthCare.gov numbers outpaced 2016 during first week of open enrollment

    Women in business

    Sign-ups during the first week of ACA open enrollment outpaced last year’s, suggesting concerns that enrollment would falter this year were overblown.

    Government

    Feds backing out of lawsuit against HCR ManorCare

    Women in business

    The federal government is moving to dismiss a lawsuit it brought two years ago against the national nursing-care provider after a judge tossed out the government’s key witness over issues of credibility.

    Finance

    CHI cuts quarterly operating loss by more than half

    Women in business

    Catholic Health Initiatives reported improved financial results in the quarter ended Sept. 30, and officials say the health system is making progress with a turnaround.

    Technology

    DEA cracking down on fake fentanyl traffickers

    Women in business

    The goal is to make it easier for federal prosecutors to go after people who peddle illicit versions of the deadly opioid fentanyl that are fueling the nation’s drug abuse crisis.

    Transformation

    Using avatars to practice hard conversations

    Women in business

    A pilot program, funded by the CDC’s cancer division, is experimenting with allowing patients to ask a virtual coach questions that they might otherwise feel too uncomfortable or overwhelmed to ask a real physician.

    Safety & Quality

    Overlapping neurosurgeries don’t hurt patient outcomes

    Women in business

    Patient outcomes don’t suffer when surgeons perform critical parts of the procedure and then depart for another underway, according to a new JAMA study.

    People

    Guest Commentary: More providers need to embrace integrative health approach

    Women in business

    Our healthcare system is obsessed with delivering medical services, performing procedures and prescribing medications. It really needs to become obsessed with producing health.

    Surveys

    This week’s poll: Has Trump been good or bad for healthcare?

    Women in business

    Share your opinion in the latest edition of our biweekly reader poll. Has Trump been good or bad for healthcare?



    Women in business

    Women in business

    GIFTS THAT GIVE BACK

    Give a gift that helps a woman survivor of war.

    Your gift will help a woman in need rebuild her life and spread the goodwill of the season to your loved ones.

    2017 Luncheon

    Women in business

    SUPPORTING REFUGEES

    Women in business

    Celebrity Spotlight: Sophie Turner

    Women in business

    LEARN MORE

    Women in business

    Women in business

    Women in business

    Women in business

    My name is Regina

    Since joining Women for Women International, Regina has been working to improve the health of those in her community.

    Women in business

    My Name Is Awham

    Awham remembers the year the war started in Iraq, and the additional hardships she faced after her husband fell ill and lost his job. “I was left to care for my four children with no income.

    Women in business

    My name is Zarghuna

    I am 38 years old. There was no happiness in my childhood. When I was six years old, my brother lost a dog-fighting match and started fighting with my cousin which led to my cousin’s death.

    Women in business

    My name is Nabintu

    I was a happy woman, wife, and mother before the war came to my front door. After high school, I wanted to earn some money and explore the city so I went to be a babysitter for a family in Bukavu.

    Women in business

    My Name is Caritas

    I’m 39 years old. I’m married and I have two children of my own, a son and a daughter. And I have adopted five more children, because of the genocide.