#entrepreneur ideas

#

10 Ideas Driving The Future Of Social Entrepreneurship

The 10th Annual Skoll World Forum. which brought together several hundred of the world s leading social entrepreneurs to Oxford, has just wrapped for another year. The Forum serves as a useful barometer for how the climate of social enterprise is changing.

When it launched in 2004, it was all about celebrating the unknown social entrepreneurs, helping give them global recognition and credibility, and a platform to engage with policy leaders and large corporations.

In that task, it has succeeded brilliantly over the past decade, social enterprise has become mainstream. Jeff Skoll picks out the award of the Nobel Peace Prize to Muhammad Yunus in 2006 as a watershed moment, followed equally significantly in the following year by the award to Al Gore.

How is it that if no-one is for these things, and everyone is against them, these problems continue?

So 10 years in, what s the current thinking? What new big idea now dominates the agenda and concerns of the Forum participants? And where do they think this field is going?

Broadcaster Ray Suarez expressed it eloquently when he said, Nobody ever comes out and says they are in favor of starving children, or inadequate sanitation, or war and conflict. And yet they persist. So how is it that if no-one is for these things, and everyone is against them, these problems continue?

Everyone at the Forum was in some way wrestling with that question. Whether it was this year s Skoll awardee Carne Ross, whose organization Independent Diplomat is seeking to turn the closed, rigged game of international diplomacy on its head, or Salman Khan s Khan Academy whose new model of free, online tuition is re-shaping how education is delivered, system change is the new game in town.

In Dare to Imagine, the film from the Forum s Opening Plenary, a theoretical physicist, a publisher, a neuroscientist, a technologist, a social financier, and a young science prodigy speculate on the next 50 years ahead. All agree on one thing that the old, incremental way of tackling problems won t work anymore; that we need to radically imagine new ways of coming together to deal with the accelerating world of change. But the film is also profoundly optimistic never before have we had so many ideas and tools to help us cope with this change.

Who better to address this issue than Ashoka (where I work) founder Bill Drayton, the man who was among the first to set out the very concept of social entrepreneur ? Drayton outlined to a packed room his view on what Ashoka considers the next big idea in moving the field what he calls Framework Change, In Drayton s view, to fix our broken systems, we need to accelerate the number of changemakers in the world, and ultimately get to a world in which everyone is a changemaker. That message really seemed to resonate at this year s Forum.

A significant number of discussions highlighted the vital role of young people. Bill Drayton estimates that about 700 of the 3,000 social entrepreneurs in the Ashoka network work directly with youth in some way ,and that helping young people develop the life skills to flourish in this new world is critical to solving the problems we re facing. In particular, helping a child master cognitive empathy was cited by Drayton and others as a foundation skill that could set up a child for life, and speakers such as Taddy Blecher of CIDA and Sandy Speicher of Ideo showed how such models are working in India, South Africa, Peru and around the world.

In this year s Forum, I sensed a strong undercurrent of feeling that scaling impact need not be the same thing as scaling the organisation. Partnerships, franchising, scaling through influence and encouraging imitation: These were all strong themes that emerged in many conversations. Whether this was a response to a reduced funding environment or a strategic choice based on new more effective ways of delivering impact, there was real optimism about the new models emerging. I saw dozens of deals and partnerships being brokered around me. I believe in collaborating to the point of pathology, says Willie Foote, CEO of Root Capital. And he should know from a tiny start-up only a few years ago, Root Capital has now mobilized over $500 million to support farmers in developing countries. If pathological collaboration is Foote s mantra, I say amen.

I believe in collaborating to the point of pathology.

It s always fun to talk about tech, but this year tech was at the heart of conversations on disrupting systems. Whether on how apps helped monitor human rights in the Arab Spring, to discussions on how mobile phone technology is transforming financial services in Africa and insights on tech disruptions in education caused by new models such as Khan Academy. Premal Shah spoke about how Kiva is seeing loans coming from emerging markets into the U.S. defying our assumptions on the traditional north/south relationship. The democratizing power of tech, and ability to impact political situations such as the Arab Spring, was also highlighted, which bring us to

There was a universal agreement that empowering people as far down the chain as possible is key to the system change that we are witnessing. Whether this is was through technology giving people unprecedented access to real-time information, to apps that can transform anyone into a blogger or journalist orcommentator, the days of the few commanding the many (even if those few are brilliant, enlightened social entrepreneurs) is coming to an end. There was a rising view that lean, flexible, teams are going to eat the lunch of the old dinosaurs, and that s as true for NGOs and social enterprises as it is for corporations.

Are NGO, the corporation, and the government agency reaching the end of their shelf life in their current form? Sarah Severn from Nike spoke about integrating sustainability into the DNA of the business, and Maura O Neill, Chief Innovation Officer of USAID spoke about re-engineering the aid model in language any corporate CEO would recognize. It s getting hard to tell who was the NGO and who was the corporate leader. And that s a great thing.

The Forum has always brought together leading social entrepreneurs in conversation with corporate and political partners. But this year I glimpsed the emergence of a new beast prowling the halls: the self-identified social intrapreneur. the change maker who is working within an organization or the political system. From pioneering executives such as Gib Bulloch at Accenture Development Partners to his counterparts at Unilever, Mckinsey, and many other firms, these individuals are creatively finding ways to turn their own organizations into change agents. And it s clear that they are warmly welcomed by the social entrepreneurs we need change agents within large corporations as well as outside. Will there one day be a Skoll World Forum on Social Intrapreneurship? For my part, I hope that soon people won t even notice the difference.

As the Forum passes its tenth year, many leaders of the social enterprise movement are approaching or into their 70s or older. A poignant moment occurred during a panel discussion when Bill Strickland, Paul Farmer and former Norwegian Prime Minister Gro Harlem Brundtland, titans of this movement, were asked about succession planning and how they saw legacy. Interesting, all answered that they found saw their legacy in teaching, mentoring, and inspiring others. One torch can light many fires was a common theme. And the fire doesn t have to be spread just within the organization none of them saw succession planning as simply being to find someone to step into their immediate role.

A 10 year anniversary is a great moment to look back, take stock, and then imagine the future. The field of social entrepreneurship has blossomed since the Forum launched and the ideas which a decade ago seemed so radical are now the norm in campuses and boardrooms across the world. If this Forum is anything to go by, the next 10 years are going to be even more disruptive and exciting than the last.



#rcm business

#

Healthcare is undeniably India s largest sector nowadays in terms of both revenue and employment. Healthcare as a whole comprise hospitals, medical devices / equipments, outsourcing, medical tourism and health insurance.

Deloitte Touche Tohmatsu India, a multinational professional service company has estimated that the overall Indian healthcare market today is worth US$ 100 billion and will likely to grow at a CAGR of 23 per cent to US$ 280 billion by 2020.

The Indian medical tourism industry is pegged at US$ 3 billion per annum, with an estimated 230,000 medical tourists arriving in the country. This is expected to double sharply in the next four years to US$ 6 billion.

The healthcare segment has attracted Foreign Direct Investment (FDI) worth US$ 3.41 billion between April 2000 and December 2015, according to the Department of Industrial Policy and Promotion (DIPP).

With this sharp increase, India requires 600,000 to 700,000 additional beds over the next five to six years, indicative of an investment opportunity of US$ 25-30 billion. Given this demand for capital, the number of transactions in the healthcare space is expected to witness a sharp increase in the near future. Increase in number of transactions means a healthy rise in Revenue Cycle Management (RCM) provided the RCM company adapts a holistic approach to the process and provide a complete solution. Those firms that follow this practice will be in a position to grab larger share of market in the future.

Other than this, the outsourced market in the healthcare segment is estimated to be around US$ 8 billion, a majority of which is in the US, followed by India. In a flourishing trend, most of the US Healthcare providers are outsourcing their non-core processes like RCM to third-party service providers in other English speaking countries, where India is choosen as a favourabe destination.

The competitive advantage that India has is her large pool of English speaking, talented, well trained professionals with good analytical skills which is essential for BPO indusry, not to mention the cost competitiveness compared to other English speaking countries. The matured medical education system in the country is also widely appreciated abroad.

Eventhough, apprehensions existed few years back about India s ability to handle complex US healthcare process, now they have been removed, as the RCM players have invested wisely for training and upgradation of systems with in the organisation.

So far the major RCM companies in India have been focussing on large sized hospitals in US, the less than 500 bed mid sized hospitals are untouched. This niche market will become attractive in the coming years for RCM companies to work on.

With the internal development in healthcare business with in the country along with the outsourced businesses, the RCM business in India has a tremendous growth opportunity in the coming years.

What is required to grab a major pie of this business is to keep investing money and time to employ / train periodically the healthcare management personnel and invest on the advanced technology to store, manage and analyse, data which helps in automating the RCM process. With these in place, no stopping India as a future leader in Revenue Cycle Management.

Written 4w ago Not for Reproduction



#

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A Culture of Excellence and Responsibility

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Cardinal is a long term asset play, in a traditional energy sector that continues to grow globally. We are managed by public company and energy industry professionals that are admired and dedicated to their craft. We are a resourceful player suited to take advantage of the industry downturn.

Our management brings the depth of experience and diversity to steer Cardinal’s future. Our team has an average of over 25 years’ experience, with some of our individuals approaching 40 years’ of know-how in their respective fields of expertise.

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#business journal

#

Future Business Journal

Future Business Journal

Production and Hosting by Elsevier B.V. on behalf of Faculty of Commerce and Business Administration, Future University.

Peer Review under the responsibility of Faculty of Commerce and Business Administration, Future University

The Future Business Journal is a blind peer-reviewed journal that will be published bi-annually by Future University in Egypt. It is dedicated to increasing the depth of the subject across disciplines with the ultimate aim of expanding knowledge of the subject.
The Future Business Journal (FBJ) publishes conceptual and empirical research papers spanning all the major research fields in Management, Marketing, Accounting, Micro Economics, Management Information Systems, and Finance. The Journal’s emphasis is on theoretical developments and their implementation, empirical, applied, and policy-oriented research in Management, Marketing, Accounting, Micro-Economics Management Information System and Finance. The Journal’s purpose is to improve communications between, and within, the academic and other research communities and policymakers and operational decision makers. Future Business Journal fills a unique niche among business publications of its type by publishing articles that strike a balance.

The Future Business Journal is a blind peer-reviewed journal that will be published bi-annually by Future University in Egypt. It is dedicated to increasing the depth of the subject across disciplines with the ultimate aim of expanding knowledge of the subject.
The Future Business Journal (FBJ) publishes conceptual and empirical research papers spanning all the major research fields in Management, Marketing, Accounting, Micro Economics, Management Information Systems, and Finance. The Journal’s emphasis is on theoretical developments and their implementation, empirical, applied, and policy-oriented research in Management, Marketing, Accounting, Micro-Economics Management Information System and Finance. The Journal’s purpose is to improve communications between, and within, the academic and other research communities and policymakers and operational decision makers. Future Business Journal fills a unique niche among business publications of its type by publishing articles that strike a balance between the practical and the academic fields, recognizing the intricate relationships between many areas of business activities.



#

What is Commodity Trading?

Commodity trading refers to the buying and selling of certain assets, with the intention of making a profit. Tradable commodities include gold, silver, copper, wheat, coffee, oil and many other metals, agricultural and energy products.

With Accendo Markets, you can trade your chosen commodities online, at the touch of a button.

Fill in your details opposite to receive your commodity trading guide. free of charge.

Your report will tell you:

  • How to trade
  • When to buy
  • When to sell
  • Risks to manage
  • Pitfalls to avoid

Alternatively, if you’d like to open a live account visit our account application page .

Commodities can be raw, unrefined products, like corn, oil, gold, wheat, barley, sugar, maize, cocoa, coffee, lumber, silver or pork bellies [Read more below]

So, What Is Commodity Trading

[Continued] Commodities can be traded using futures, CFDs, spread bets and options. Your chosen instrument will be determined by a variety of factors, including whether you wish to take delivery of the underlying or you re purely speculating on price. For many private traders, it will be the latter.

Commodity Trading Explained

A futures contract is an agreement to buy or sell a specific commodity now, at a specific price, for delivery on a specific date in the future. This contract is made through a commodity broker. If you are a farmer and you agree to sell a certain amount of your product, be it wheat, corn or another physical commodity, at a certain time or a certain price, then you are insuring against a future fall in the price of your product. If corn is ten pounds a ton when you sign the contract, but has fallen to £8 when the contract if fulfilled, then you still receive your ten pounds. Of course, if the price of corn has risen to £12, then you lose out on the profit.

The commodities trader is speculating on the fluctuating prices of commodities with the aim of making a profit whether the price goes up or down. It should be emphasised that traders are interested only in the trading process and not in the commodity. They leave the process before the delivery date of the contract, taking with them either their profit or their loss.

Learn Before You Earn – Commodity Trading

Traders in commodities are interested in making a profit. Of course, there is a lot to learn about the business, but at its very heart is a simple process which all traders follow. They either ‘go long’ or ‘go short.’ In rising market they ‘go long’ by buying the commodity when it is cheap and selling it when the price of the commodity has risen. In a falling market they ‘go short’ and sell when the price is still high and buy back the future when it has become cheaper. This is the essential truth about commodity trading, although the reality is much elaborated and even the contracts come in various types, such as spot prices, forwards, futures or options on futures. In the UK, CFDs and spread betting are the most popular methods of trading commodities.

How Accendo Markets Can Help You

For more information about commodity trading, or to find out about any other aspect of financial trading, contact Accendo Markets today. We have many options available to suit you and well-trained and informed brokers are on hand to assist with your trading needs.

CFDs, spreadbetting and spot FX are leveraged products & can result in losses exceeding your initial deposit. They are not suitable for everyone, so please ensure that you understand the risks.
The value of shares can go down as well as up, so you could get back less than you invest.

Telephone calls and online chat conversations may be monitored and recorded for regulatory and training purposes.

* We provide these as underlying assets to CFDs and Spreadbets.

To view our policies and terms, please click here

This website is not intended for or directed at residents of the United States or any country outside the UK. It is not intended for use by or distribution to any person in any jurisdiction or country where its use or distribution would contravene any regulation or local law.
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Like many websites, we use cookies for statistical purposes and to acquire information on general internet use. This helps ensure that you get the full benefit of our services, and enhances your browsing experience. For more details on the cookies we use, view our privacy policy under the heading ‘How We Use Cookies’. By using this website, we’ll assume that you’re happy to receive all cookies from Accendo Markets.
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Accendo Markets Ltd – 1 Alie Street, London, E1 8DE (UK) Telephone: 020 3051 7461 – Accendo Markets Ltd. is Authorised and Regulated by the Financial Conduct Authority (FCA) No. 475285. Accendo Markets Ltd. Registered in England and Wales No. 6417051. © Copyright Accendo Markets Ltd 2015. All rights reserved.

This website uses cookies to improve your experience. We’ll assume you’re ok with this, but you can opt-out if you wish.Accept Read More

I like the updates on shares I trade. Updates from Bloomberg and Reuters plus industry updates and breaking news. I’ve had Matt Grice and James Abbott and found both to be excellent. I would like to continue a personal service with James. He understands how and which stocks I trade.

Posted 2 months ago

The personal service of my dedicated broker is excellent. I do get daily mails on market conditions and information of future ex dividend dates of Stock by accendo Market, which is helpful to make a decisions on buy or sell stock. the whole concepts helps in to play with some money, risks and rewards in this share Market world, which makes me happy if and when I make any money,

Posted 3 months ago



#

Jet2holidays

“Affiliate marketing is a key part of our overall marketing mix & the account management team at AF have been integral in delivering such significant year-on-year growth. Their responsive & proactive nature has helped us meet tough targets.”

Singapore Airlines

“Singapore Airlines saw its affiliate sales grow by over 100% in the first 6 months of the programme going live on AF. We continue to see very positive results whilst working closely with the AF team, who are very quick to address our queries and provide support where necessary.”

Bensons for Beds

“As the UK’s number 1 bed retailer, Bensons for Beds have been working with AF since 2009. Our affiliate campaigns are now recognised as a key sales and performance channel for the business. We have found the account management team to be second to none, extremely professional & responsive, delivering insight, guidance & continued success to the programme.”

Magazinesubscriptions.co.uk

“We’ve worked with AF for a number of years now and as a marketing avenue it has consistently performed well and proved itself to be a strong channel for MagazineSubscriptions.co.uk. We receive an excellent service from our dedicated account managers who have always been exceptionally personable and client focussed. I’d recommend Affiliate Future for the delivery of a successful affiliate campaign.”

What’s New

Enhanced Visual Reporting

AF continues to improve usability of our platform. As a result of advertiser and publisher feedback, 2015 has seen the launch of the AF dashboard, allowing you to view all top line information on one screen.

Expanding Travel Network

AF is excited to announce that Cathay Pacific have just exclusively launched on our platform. AF has always had a strong offering in the travel sector and we are looking to continue this growth in 2015, supported by our specialist travel account management team.

Faster Payments

Affiliate Future now pays publishers twice a month, in our ongoing commitment to getting money to publishers quicker.



#business journal

#

Future Business Journal

Future Business Journal

Production and Hosting by Elsevier B.V. on behalf of Faculty of Commerce and Business Administration, Future University.

Peer Review under the responsibility of Faculty of Commerce and Business Administration, Future University

The Future Business Journal is a blind peer-reviewed journal that will be published bi-annually by Future University in Egypt. It is dedicated to increasing the depth of the subject across disciplines with the ultimate aim of expanding knowledge of the subject.
The Future Business Journal (FBJ) publishes conceptual and empirical research papers spanning all the major research fields in Management, Marketing, Accounting, Micro Economics, Management Information Systems, and Finance. The Journal’s emphasis is on theoretical developments and their implementation, empirical, applied, and policy-oriented research in Management, Marketing, Accounting, Micro-Economics Management Information System and Finance. The Journal’s purpose is to improve communications between, and within, the academic and other research communities and policymakers and operational decision makers. Future Business Journal fills a unique niche among business publications of its type by publishing articles that strike a balance.

The Future Business Journal is a blind peer-reviewed journal that will be published bi-annually by Future University in Egypt. It is dedicated to increasing the depth of the subject across disciplines with the ultimate aim of expanding knowledge of the subject.
The Future Business Journal (FBJ) publishes conceptual and empirical research papers spanning all the major research fields in Management, Marketing, Accounting, Micro Economics, Management Information Systems, and Finance. The Journal’s emphasis is on theoretical developments and their implementation, empirical, applied, and policy-oriented research in Management, Marketing, Accounting, Micro-Economics Management Information System and Finance. The Journal’s purpose is to improve communications between, and within, the academic and other research communities and policymakers and operational decision makers. Future Business Journal fills a unique niche among business publications of its type by publishing articles that strike a balance between the practical and the academic fields, recognizing the intricate relationships between many areas of business activities.



#entrepreneur ideas

#

10 Ideas Driving The Future Of Social Entrepreneurship

The 10th Annual Skoll World Forum. which brought together several hundred of the world s leading social entrepreneurs to Oxford, has just wrapped for another year. The Forum serves as a useful barometer for how the climate of social enterprise is changing.

When it launched in 2004, it was all about celebrating the unknown social entrepreneurs, helping give them global recognition and credibility, and a platform to engage with policy leaders and large corporations.

In that task, it has succeeded brilliantly over the past decade, social enterprise has become mainstream. Jeff Skoll picks out the award of the Nobel Peace Prize to Muhammad Yunus in 2006 as a watershed moment, followed equally significantly in the following year by the award to Al Gore.

How is it that if no-one is for these things, and everyone is against them, these problems continue?

So 10 years in, what s the current thinking? What new big idea now dominates the agenda and concerns of the Forum participants? And where do they think this field is going?

Broadcaster Ray Suarez expressed it eloquently when he said, Nobody ever comes out and says they are in favor of starving children, or inadequate sanitation, or war and conflict. And yet they persist. So how is it that if no-one is for these things, and everyone is against them, these problems continue?

Everyone at the Forum was in some way wrestling with that question. Whether it was this year s Skoll awardee Carne Ross, whose organization Independent Diplomat is seeking to turn the closed, rigged game of international diplomacy on its head, or Salman Khan s Khan Academy whose new model of free, online tuition is re-shaping how education is delivered, system change is the new game in town.

In Dare to Imagine, the film from the Forum s Opening Plenary, a theoretical physicist, a publisher, a neuroscientist, a technologist, a social financier, and a young science prodigy speculate on the next 50 years ahead. All agree on one thing that the old, incremental way of tackling problems won t work anymore; that we need to radically imagine new ways of coming together to deal with the accelerating world of change. But the film is also profoundly optimistic never before have we had so many ideas and tools to help us cope with this change.

Who better to address this issue than Ashoka (where I work) founder Bill Drayton, the man who was among the first to set out the very concept of social entrepreneur ? Drayton outlined to a packed room his view on what Ashoka considers the next big idea in moving the field what he calls Framework Change, In Drayton s view, to fix our broken systems, we need to accelerate the number of changemakers in the world, and ultimately get to a world in which everyone is a changemaker. That message really seemed to resonate at this year s Forum.

A significant number of discussions highlighted the vital role of young people. Bill Drayton estimates that about 700 of the 3,000 social entrepreneurs in the Ashoka network work directly with youth in some way ,and that helping young people develop the life skills to flourish in this new world is critical to solving the problems we re facing. In particular, helping a child master cognitive empathy was cited by Drayton and others as a foundation skill that could set up a child for life, and speakers such as Taddy Blecher of CIDA and Sandy Speicher of Ideo showed how such models are working in India, South Africa, Peru and around the world.

In this year s Forum, I sensed a strong undercurrent of feeling that scaling impact need not be the same thing as scaling the organisation. Partnerships, franchising, scaling through influence and encouraging imitation: These were all strong themes that emerged in many conversations. Whether this was a response to a reduced funding environment or a strategic choice based on new more effective ways of delivering impact, there was real optimism about the new models emerging. I saw dozens of deals and partnerships being brokered around me. I believe in collaborating to the point of pathology, says Willie Foote, CEO of Root Capital. And he should know from a tiny start-up only a few years ago, Root Capital has now mobilized over $500 million to support farmers in developing countries. If pathological collaboration is Foote s mantra, I say amen.

I believe in collaborating to the point of pathology.

It s always fun to talk about tech, but this year tech was at the heart of conversations on disrupting systems. Whether on how apps helped monitor human rights in the Arab Spring, to discussions on how mobile phone technology is transforming financial services in Africa and insights on tech disruptions in education caused by new models such as Khan Academy. Premal Shah spoke about how Kiva is seeing loans coming from emerging markets into the U.S. defying our assumptions on the traditional north/south relationship. The democratizing power of tech, and ability to impact political situations such as the Arab Spring, was also highlighted, which bring us to

There was a universal agreement that empowering people as far down the chain as possible is key to the system change that we are witnessing. Whether this is was through technology giving people unprecedented access to real-time information, to apps that can transform anyone into a blogger or journalist orcommentator, the days of the few commanding the many (even if those few are brilliant, enlightened social entrepreneurs) is coming to an end. There was a rising view that lean, flexible, teams are going to eat the lunch of the old dinosaurs, and that s as true for NGOs and social enterprises as it is for corporations.

Are NGO, the corporation, and the government agency reaching the end of their shelf life in their current form? Sarah Severn from Nike spoke about integrating sustainability into the DNA of the business, and Maura O Neill, Chief Innovation Officer of USAID spoke about re-engineering the aid model in language any corporate CEO would recognize. It s getting hard to tell who was the NGO and who was the corporate leader. And that s a great thing.

The Forum has always brought together leading social entrepreneurs in conversation with corporate and political partners. But this year I glimpsed the emergence of a new beast prowling the halls: the self-identified social intrapreneur. the change maker who is working within an organization or the political system. From pioneering executives such as Gib Bulloch at Accenture Development Partners to his counterparts at Unilever, Mckinsey, and many other firms, these individuals are creatively finding ways to turn their own organizations into change agents. And it s clear that they are warmly welcomed by the social entrepreneurs we need change agents within large corporations as well as outside. Will there one day be a Skoll World Forum on Social Intrapreneurship? For my part, I hope that soon people won t even notice the difference.

As the Forum passes its tenth year, many leaders of the social enterprise movement are approaching or into their 70s or older. A poignant moment occurred during a panel discussion when Bill Strickland, Paul Farmer and former Norwegian Prime Minister Gro Harlem Brundtland, titans of this movement, were asked about succession planning and how they saw legacy. Interesting, all answered that they found saw their legacy in teaching, mentoring, and inspiring others. One torch can light many fires was a common theme. And the fire doesn t have to be spread just within the organization none of them saw succession planning as simply being to find someone to step into their immediate role.

A 10 year anniversary is a great moment to look back, take stock, and then imagine the future. The field of social entrepreneurship has blossomed since the Forum launched and the ideas which a decade ago seemed so radical are now the norm in campuses and boardrooms across the world. If this Forum is anything to go by, the next 10 years are going to be even more disruptive and exciting than the last.



#rcm business

#

Healthcare is undeniably India s largest sector nowadays in terms of both revenue and employment. Healthcare as a whole comprise hospitals, medical devices / equipments, outsourcing, medical tourism and health insurance.

Deloitte Touche Tohmatsu India, a multinational professional service company has estimated that the overall Indian healthcare market today is worth US$ 100 billion and will likely to grow at a CAGR of 23 per cent to US$ 280 billion by 2020.

The Indian medical tourism industry is pegged at US$ 3 billion per annum, with an estimated 230,000 medical tourists arriving in the country. This is expected to double sharply in the next four years to US$ 6 billion.

The healthcare segment has attracted Foreign Direct Investment (FDI) worth US$ 3.41 billion between April 2000 and December 2015, according to the Department of Industrial Policy and Promotion (DIPP).

With this sharp increase, India requires 600,000 to 700,000 additional beds over the next five to six years, indicative of an investment opportunity of US$ 25-30 billion. Given this demand for capital, the number of transactions in the healthcare space is expected to witness a sharp increase in the near future. Increase in number of transactions means a healthy rise in Revenue Cycle Management (RCM) provided the RCM company adapts a holistic approach to the process and provide a complete solution. Those firms that follow this practice will be in a position to grab larger share of market in the future.

Other than this, the outsourced market in the healthcare segment is estimated to be around US$ 8 billion, a majority of which is in the US, followed by India. In a flourishing trend, most of the US Healthcare providers are outsourcing their non-core processes like RCM to third-party service providers in other English speaking countries, where India is choosen as a favourabe destination.

The competitive advantage that India has is her large pool of English speaking, talented, well trained professionals with good analytical skills which is essential for BPO indusry, not to mention the cost competitiveness compared to other English speaking countries. The matured medical education system in the country is also widely appreciated abroad.

Eventhough, apprehensions existed few years back about India s ability to handle complex US healthcare process, now they have been removed, as the RCM players have invested wisely for training and upgradation of systems with in the organisation.

So far the major RCM companies in India have been focussing on large sized hospitals in US, the less than 500 bed mid sized hospitals are untouched. This niche market will become attractive in the coming years for RCM companies to work on.

With the internal development in healthcare business with in the country along with the outsourced businesses, the RCM business in India has a tremendous growth opportunity in the coming years.

What is required to grab a major pie of this business is to keep investing money and time to employ / train periodically the healthcare management personnel and invest on the advanced technology to store, manage and analyse, data which helps in automating the RCM process. With these in place, no stopping India as a future leader in Revenue Cycle Management.

Written 4w ago Not for Reproduction



#entrepreneur ideas

#

10 Ideas Driving The Future Of Social Entrepreneurship

The 10th Annual Skoll World Forum. which brought together several hundred of the world s leading social entrepreneurs to Oxford, has just wrapped for another year. The Forum serves as a useful barometer for how the climate of social enterprise is changing.

When it launched in 2004, it was all about celebrating the unknown social entrepreneurs, helping give them global recognition and credibility, and a platform to engage with policy leaders and large corporations.

In that task, it has succeeded brilliantly over the past decade, social enterprise has become mainstream. Jeff Skoll picks out the award of the Nobel Peace Prize to Muhammad Yunus in 2006 as a watershed moment, followed equally significantly in the following year by the award to Al Gore.

How is it that if no-one is for these things, and everyone is against them, these problems continue?

So 10 years in, what s the current thinking? What new big idea now dominates the agenda and concerns of the Forum participants? And where do they think this field is going?

Broadcaster Ray Suarez expressed it eloquently when he said, Nobody ever comes out and says they are in favor of starving children, or inadequate sanitation, or war and conflict. And yet they persist. So how is it that if no-one is for these things, and everyone is against them, these problems continue?

Everyone at the Forum was in some way wrestling with that question. Whether it was this year s Skoll awardee Carne Ross, whose organization Independent Diplomat is seeking to turn the closed, rigged game of international diplomacy on its head, or Salman Khan s Khan Academy whose new model of free, online tuition is re-shaping how education is delivered, system change is the new game in town.

In Dare to Imagine, the film from the Forum s Opening Plenary, a theoretical physicist, a publisher, a neuroscientist, a technologist, a social financier, and a young science prodigy speculate on the next 50 years ahead. All agree on one thing that the old, incremental way of tackling problems won t work anymore; that we need to radically imagine new ways of coming together to deal with the accelerating world of change. But the film is also profoundly optimistic never before have we had so many ideas and tools to help us cope with this change.

Who better to address this issue than Ashoka (where I work) founder Bill Drayton, the man who was among the first to set out the very concept of social entrepreneur ? Drayton outlined to a packed room his view on what Ashoka considers the next big idea in moving the field what he calls Framework Change, In Drayton s view, to fix our broken systems, we need to accelerate the number of changemakers in the world, and ultimately get to a world in which everyone is a changemaker. That message really seemed to resonate at this year s Forum.

A significant number of discussions highlighted the vital role of young people. Bill Drayton estimates that about 700 of the 3,000 social entrepreneurs in the Ashoka network work directly with youth in some way ,and that helping young people develop the life skills to flourish in this new world is critical to solving the problems we re facing. In particular, helping a child master cognitive empathy was cited by Drayton and others as a foundation skill that could set up a child for life, and speakers such as Taddy Blecher of CIDA and Sandy Speicher of Ideo showed how such models are working in India, South Africa, Peru and around the world.

In this year s Forum, I sensed a strong undercurrent of feeling that scaling impact need not be the same thing as scaling the organisation. Partnerships, franchising, scaling through influence and encouraging imitation: These were all strong themes that emerged in many conversations. Whether this was a response to a reduced funding environment or a strategic choice based on new more effective ways of delivering impact, there was real optimism about the new models emerging. I saw dozens of deals and partnerships being brokered around me. I believe in collaborating to the point of pathology, says Willie Foote, CEO of Root Capital. And he should know from a tiny start-up only a few years ago, Root Capital has now mobilized over $500 million to support farmers in developing countries. If pathological collaboration is Foote s mantra, I say amen.

I believe in collaborating to the point of pathology.

It s always fun to talk about tech, but this year tech was at the heart of conversations on disrupting systems. Whether on how apps helped monitor human rights in the Arab Spring, to discussions on how mobile phone technology is transforming financial services in Africa and insights on tech disruptions in education caused by new models such as Khan Academy. Premal Shah spoke about how Kiva is seeing loans coming from emerging markets into the U.S. defying our assumptions on the traditional north/south relationship. The democratizing power of tech, and ability to impact political situations such as the Arab Spring, was also highlighted, which bring us to

There was a universal agreement that empowering people as far down the chain as possible is key to the system change that we are witnessing. Whether this is was through technology giving people unprecedented access to real-time information, to apps that can transform anyone into a blogger or journalist orcommentator, the days of the few commanding the many (even if those few are brilliant, enlightened social entrepreneurs) is coming to an end. There was a rising view that lean, flexible, teams are going to eat the lunch of the old dinosaurs, and that s as true for NGOs and social enterprises as it is for corporations.

Are NGO, the corporation, and the government agency reaching the end of their shelf life in their current form? Sarah Severn from Nike spoke about integrating sustainability into the DNA of the business, and Maura O Neill, Chief Innovation Officer of USAID spoke about re-engineering the aid model in language any corporate CEO would recognize. It s getting hard to tell who was the NGO and who was the corporate leader. And that s a great thing.

The Forum has always brought together leading social entrepreneurs in conversation with corporate and political partners. But this year I glimpsed the emergence of a new beast prowling the halls: the self-identified social intrapreneur. the change maker who is working within an organization or the political system. From pioneering executives such as Gib Bulloch at Accenture Development Partners to his counterparts at Unilever, Mckinsey, and many other firms, these individuals are creatively finding ways to turn their own organizations into change agents. And it s clear that they are warmly welcomed by the social entrepreneurs we need change agents within large corporations as well as outside. Will there one day be a Skoll World Forum on Social Intrapreneurship? For my part, I hope that soon people won t even notice the difference.

As the Forum passes its tenth year, many leaders of the social enterprise movement are approaching or into their 70s or older. A poignant moment occurred during a panel discussion when Bill Strickland, Paul Farmer and former Norwegian Prime Minister Gro Harlem Brundtland, titans of this movement, were asked about succession planning and how they saw legacy. Interesting, all answered that they found saw their legacy in teaching, mentoring, and inspiring others. One torch can light many fires was a common theme. And the fire doesn t have to be spread just within the organization none of them saw succession planning as simply being to find someone to step into their immediate role.

A 10 year anniversary is a great moment to look back, take stock, and then imagine the future. The field of social entrepreneurship has blossomed since the Forum launched and the ideas which a decade ago seemed so radical are now the norm in campuses and boardrooms across the world. If this Forum is anything to go by, the next 10 years are going to be even more disruptive and exciting than the last.