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Available Water Quality General Permits

The discharge of wastewater and certain types of stormwater into or adjacent to water in the state (HTML) must be authorized by the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ). This authorization may come in the form of an individual discharge permit or a general permit. Seeking authorization under a general permit is generally less time-consuming than authorization under an individual permit and usually requires fewer resources.

The status of general permits that are being renewed or amended will be discussed at quarterly Water Quality Advisory Workgroup meetings, which are open to the public.

Renewal of the Petroleum Contaminated Water General Permit No. TXG830000

The TCEQ is proposing to renew and amend the Petroleum Contaminated Water General Permit TXG830000, which authorizes the discharge of water contaminated by petroleum fuel or petroleum substances into or adjacent to water in the state. The current permit expires on September 12, 2018. The TCEQ is currently developing the draft permit.

Renewal of the Petroleum Bulk Stations and Terminals General Permit No. TXG340000

The TCEQ is proposing to renew the Petroleum Bulk Stations and Terminals General Permit TXG340000, which authorizes the discharge of facility wastewater, contact stormwater, and stormwater associated with industrial activities from petroleum bulk stations and terminals. The current permit expires on October 24, 2017. Notice of the draft permit was published in the Texas Register Texas security generalon May 19, 2017 and the public comment period ended June 19, 2017. The commission is expected to take action on this permit on October 4, 2017.

Renewal of the Construction General Permit No. TXR150000

The TCEQ is proposing to renew the Construction General Permit TXR150000, which authorizes discharges of stormwater from construction activities. The current permit expires on March 5, 2018. Notice of the draft permit will be published in the Texas Register Texas security generalon August 18, 2017.

  • Draft Permit is available for review and comment.
  • Fact Sheet contains additional information about the draft permit.
  • Public Notice contains information on how to submit comments on the draft permit.
  • A public meeting will be held at 1:30 p.m., September 18, 2017, in TCEQ’s complex at 12100 Park 35 Circle, Building E, Room 201S, Austin, Texas.
  • The comment period ends on September 18, 2017.

Renewal of the Municipal Separate Storm Sewer System (MS4) General Permit No. TXR040000

The TCEQ is proposing to renew the Municipal Separate Storm Sewer System (MS4) General Permit TXR040000, which authorizes the discharge of stormwater from certain small MS4s. The current permit expires on December 13, 2018. The TCEQ is currently developing the draft permit.

The following Water Quality General Permits are available:

Aquaculture General Permit (TXG130000) (HTML), which authorizes the discharge of wastewater from aquaculture facilities and certain related activities.

Municipal Separate Storm Sewer System (MS4) (TXR040000) (HTML), which authorizes the discharge of stormwater from certain small MS4s.

Multi-Sector General Permit (TXR050000) (HTML), which authorizes discharges of stormwater from certain industrial activities.

Construction General Permit (TXR150000) (HTML), which authorizes discharges of stormwater from construction activities.

Ready-Mixed Concrete Plants, Concrete Products Plants, and Their Associated Facilities General Permit (TXG110000) (HTML), which authorizes the discharge of facility wastewater, contact stormwater, and stormwater associated with this industrial activity.

Petroleum Bulk Stations and Terminals General Permit (TXG340000) (HTML), which authorizes the discharge of facility wastewater, contact stormwater, and stormwater associated with industrial activities from petroleum bulk stations and terminals.

Hydrostatic Test Water General Permit (TXG670000) (HTML), which authorizes the discharge of hydrostatic test waters.

Petroleum Contaminated Water General Permit (TXG830000) (HTML), which authorizes the discharge of water contaminated by petroleum fuel or petroleum substances.

Pesticides General Permit (PGP) TXG870000 (HTML), which authorizes the discharge of pesticides for the control of mosquitoes and other insects, vegetation and algae, animal pests, area-wide pests, and forest-canopy pests.

Concentrated Animal Feeding Operations (CAFO) General Permit (TXG920000) (HTML), which authorizes the discharge by evaporation or irrigation of manure, litter, and wastewater associated with the operation of a CAFO.

Manure Compost General Permit (WQG200000) (HTML), which authorizes the disposal of wastewater generated from livestock manure compost operations by evaporation or irrigation.

Quarries in the Graves Scenic Riverway Permit (TXG500000 ) (HTML), which authorizes the discharge into or adjacent to water in the state from quarries located greater than one mile from a water body in a water quality protection area in the John Graves Scenic Riverway.

Evaporation Pond General Permit (WQG100000 ) (HTML), which authorizes wastewater generated by industrial or water treatment facilities to be disposed of by evaporation from surface impoundments adjacent to water in the state.

Harris County On-site Wastewater General Permit (TXG530000) Texas security general, which authorizes the discharge of wastewater from on-site treatment systems connected to single family residences located in Harris County, Texas.



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Fighting Alcoholism With Medications

Drugs combined with support can help alcoholics kick alcohol addiction.

WebMD archives content after 2 years to ensure our readers can easily find the most timely content.

“>From the WebMD Archives

There is no magic pill or one-size-fits-all treatment that can banish an alcoholic’s need or desire to drink.

But a handful of FDA-approved medications, when used in combination with psychological and social interventions such as 12-step programs, can help a significant number of alcohol-dependent patients reduce their insatiable cravings and cut back substantially on the number of heavy drinking days, say experts in alcohol abuse and dependence.

“For me, the biggest issue is not whether these medicines work, it’s why they’re not being used more often,” says addiction specialist Joseph Volpicelli, MD, PhD, associate professor of psychiatry at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine.

Despite the current understanding that alcoholism is a tenacious disease, there are lingering prejudices that cause some people to view alcohol abuse and dependence as moral failings that can be overcome simply by willpower, Volpicelli tells WebMD.

But as he and other specialists in addiction note, medications are not substitutes for drinking, but can instead help make the difference between an alcoholic’s successful recovery or relapse.

“I think medications are very important and effective and work best when they’re used with psychosocial modalities,” agrees Merrill Herman, MD, director of psychiatric services for Montefiore Medical Center’s substance abuse treatment program and president of the New York Society of Addiction Medicine in New York City.

Roger D. Weiss, MD, a professor of psychiatry at Harvard Medical School in Boston and clinical director of the alcohol and drug abuse treatment program at McLean Hospital in Belmont, Mass., notes that “medications can sometimes reduce the desire to drink. They can attenuate [weaken] the response that people get to alcohol, to make it less reinforcing, and they can, depending on which medication you’re talking about, help reduce protracted, longer-term withdrawal distress.”

There are three drugs approved by the FDA for the treatment of alcoholism; a fourth drug has shown promise in recent clinical trials. The following is a summary of the drugs and how they work.

Antabuse

Antabuse was approved for the treatment of alcoholism more than 50 years ago, making it the oldest such drug on the market. It works by interfering with the body’s ability to absorb alcohol — specifically by inhibiting production of an enzyme that would otherwise allow the body to absorb an alcohol breakdown product called acetaldehyde.

Continued

With no enzyme to break it down, acetaldehyde builds up in the body after even a small amount of alcohol is ingested, resulting in extremely unpleasant side effects that can include flushing, nausea, and palpitations.

“The big limitation for a medicine like Antabuse is that what people do instead of deciding that alcohol’s a bad thing to take, they think that Antabuse is a bad thing to take and they stop taking it,” Volpicelli tells WebMD.”Antabuse doesn’t take away your craving, and if you drink you still get the effects of alcohol you would normally in terms of the pleasure, until you reach the point where you start feeling sick.”

Antabuse is most effective when its use is monitored, say in an alcoholism clinic or at home by a spouse or family member, experts say.

Volpicelli has at least one patient who uses Antabuse as a kind of “chaperone” when she’s in social situations. When she starts to feel that her face is flushing, she knows that she has to stop drinking or will get very sick, he says. But for the vast majority of patients the best way to prevent relapse is to stop drinking altogether, specialists in alcoholism treatment caution.

Naltrexone

Naltrexone helps to both reduce the pleasure that alcoholics receive from drinking and the cravings that compel them to seek out more alcohol. It does so by blocking receptors (docking sites) in the brain for endorphins, proteins produced by the body that help to elevate mood. The same receptors also accept narcotics such as morphine and heroin. The drug can be taken as a once-daily pill or in a recently approved once-monthly injectable form.

“Naltrexone sort of gets at the core of what addiction is,” Volpicelli says. “The way I like to describe it is that addiction is a condition in which when you do something, you want to do more and more of it. So when people have one or two drinks, instead of stopping after a few drinks they want to have three, four, five, 10 drinks. What we found is that naltrexone breaks that positive feedback loop, so that people can have one or two drinks and they don’t feel like having any more.”

Continued

In clinical trials, oral naltrexone was shown to reduce the amount of relapses to heavy drinking (defined as four or more drinks per day for women, five or more for men). Compared with patients who took a placebo (dummy pill), alcoholics who took naltrexone had 36% fewer heavy drinking episodes over a three-month period.

In the COMBINE (Combining Medications and Behavioral Interventions for Alcoholism) study, sponsored by the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA), naltrexone was found to be as effective as up to 20 sessions of alcohol counseling by a behavioral specialist, when either was administered under a doctor’s close supervision.

Naltrexone is now available in a once-monthly injectable form called Vivitrol. The advantage of this formulation is that patients are more likely to stick with a drug they only need to take once a month, and it appears to work very well, says Herman.

Campral

Campral, taken by mouth three times daily, acts on chemical messenger systems in the brain. It appears to reduce the symptoms that alcoholics may experience when they abstain from booze over long periods. These symptoms can include insomnia, anxiety, restlessness, and unpleasant changes in mood that could lead to relapse. In European clinical trials and in pooled data from several studies, Campral increased the proportion of alcoholics who were able to refrain from drinking for several weeks or months.

However, in the COMBINE trial and another U.S. study, there was no apparent benefit to the use of Campral, either alone or in combination with naltrexone. Patients in the European trials tended to be more severely alcohol dependent than those in the U.S. studies, and most patients in European studies had been abstinent for longer periods before starting Campral, two factors that could account for the difference in the findings, according to the NIAAA.

“We use medicines to help detoxify people, but even after detoxification occurs the neurochemistry is still not in very good balance, and probably even more importantly, when your brain thinks it’s going to get alcohol, that elicits these compensatory neural changes so that the body goes through the equivalent of a little mild withdrawal, and [Campral] blocks that,” Volpicelli explains.

Continued

Topamax

Topamax is approved by the FDA for the treatment of seizures but not for alcoholism. It has a mechanism of action similar to that of Campral and may similarly help patients avoid or reduce the symptoms associated with long-term abstinence.

In a study published in The Journal of the American Medical Association in October 2007, researchers from the U.S. and Germany reported that Topamax was better than placebo at reducing the percentage of heavy drinking days over a 14-week period.

Treating Alcoholism: Drugs Alone Aren’t Enough

“All these medications work best in the context of psychosocial treatment. Just giving somebody pills without that is not as effective,” says Herman.

According to Weiss, at least three forms of psychosocial therapy have been shown to be effective at treating alcoholism, with roughly similar success rates. These include:

  • Cognitive behavioral therapy, a form of psychotherapy focusing on identifying and modifying negative thoughts and thought patterns.
  • 12-step facilitation, in which patients are encouraged to enter 12-step programs such Alcoholics Anonymous.
  • Motivational enhancement therapy, a patient-centered approach in which counselors try to get patients to think about and express their motivations for change and to develop a personal plan that can help them make the necessary changes.

Sources

Joseph Volpicelli, MD, PhD, associate professor of psychiatry, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia.

Merrill Herman, MD, director of psychiatric services, Montefiore Medical Center substance abuse treatment program; president, New York Society of Addiction Medicine, New York City.

Roger Weiss, MD, professor of psychiatry, Harvard Medical School, Boston; clinical director alcohol and drug abuse treatment program, McLean Hospital, Belmont, Mass.

Johnson, B.A. The Journal of the American Medical Association, Oct. 10, 2007; vol 298: pp 1641-1651.

National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism: “Prescribing Medications for Alcohol Dependence.”



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TAFE NSW website

Fashion courses online

  • Find a course
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  • Media centre

    Fashion courses online

    Would you like to upgrade your career but can’t seem to fit on-campus study into your busy lifestyle? Now there is a new way for to get qualified by studying online, anytime, anywhere with TAFE NSW Online courses.

    Search courses by Institute

    1. Home
    2. Course Information
    3. TAFE NSW Degrees
    4. Choose a degree
    5. Bachelor of Fashion Design

    Bachelor of Fashion Design

    Fashion courses online

    Q: Where do successful fashion designers study?

    Follow in the footsteps of industry leaders like Akiro Isogawa, Nicky Zimmerman, Alex Perry and Dion Lee.

    The Bachelor of Fashion Design is a three year professional degree offered at the Fashion Design Studio (FDS) at Ultimo in Sydney.

    In 2015 FDS was named the top fashion school in Australia by Fashionista magazine and in the top 50 fashion schools in the world. Since it was established in 1955, FDS has produced a large number of well-known and highly acclaimed fashion designers. FDS continues to produce graduates with highly developed creative and technical skills, as well as teaching students the necessary business skills to help them to achieve their career aspirations.

    More information about this course

    Duration: 3 years full time or part time equivalent

    Course load: Students must complete 28 subjects, a mix of core and electives. Students must achieve a total of 240 credit points to complete this course. Most subjects are worth 10 credit points, but some are worth 5 credit points.

    Next intake: February 2018

    Course overview: The Bachelor of Fashion Design is an undergraduate qualification taught in English. The course is located at Level 7 on the Australian Qualifications Framework.

    The degree focusses on the individuality of students, and allows you to explore your own creativity, and to draw on various design disciplines to develop your own signature style. You will be able to choose from electives in second and third year to enable you to develop specialist skills. An industry internship in third year and participation in student parades allows you to experience the full fashion cycle from design sketch to runway show.

    Entry requirements and how to apply

    You must satisfy at least one of the following four entry requirements to be eligible for admission into this course:

    • NSW HSC (Higher School Certificate) or equivalent; OR
    • Recognised Tertiary Preparation Certificate; OR
    • Certificate IV level or higher vocational qualification; OR
    • Completion of at least one year full-time study or equivalent in a degree course at a higher education institution

    This course requires you to submit additional information with your application, including a portfolio of art work to demonstrate your creative talent. This additional information will be assessed to determine your suitability for entry into this course, and where there are more applicants than study places available, will be used to rank your application.

    Note 1: You do not require an ATAR for entry into this course.

    Note 2 : If you do not meet any of the four minimum entry requirements, you may be able to apply for entry under special admissions provisions including mature age or disadvantage.

    For full details of application requirements and to download the application form, visit the Applying and fees page

    Study requirements

    STUDY PATTERN

    Full time students enrol in four subjects per semester, with face to face classes totalling approximately 16 hours per week. Students are expected to undertake an equivalent amount of private study to maximise success in the course.

    ASSESSMENT

    A range of assessment methods are used across subjects in this course to allow students to demonstrate both practical skills and theoretical knowledge. Most subjects require the completion of 3 to 4 assessment tasks. Assessment types include, but are not limited to practical exercises, concept realisation, portfolios, journals, essays, reports, written assignments and presentations.

    SUBJECTS

    You can view the course structure and an overview of study requirements for each subject by downloading the Course Information Brochure

    RECOGNITION OF PRIOR LEARNING

    Students who have completed other studies in a related field or who have extensive relevant industry experience may be eligible for exemption from similar subjects in the Bachelor of Fashion Design. All applications for exemption must be made to the course coordinator and must include supporting documentation. Students should attend class until they are formally advised that their application for exemption has been granted.

    Tuition fees

    In 2018 domestic students will pay a tuition fee of $2,050 per 10 credit point subject and $1,025 per 5 credit point subject (a total of $49,200 for the full bachelor degree*). This course attracts FEE-HELP, so eligible students can study now and pay later.

    Tuition fees for international students can be found on the TAFE NSW International website.

    *Note that tuition fees are reviewed annually and are subject to change. Check current fee information in the Fee Schedule on the Fees and Payments page.

    There may be additional costs to purchase resources required for individual subjects. The course coordinator can advise you of any additional course fees.

    Information for international students

    This course is available for enrolment by international students, subject to meeting course entry requirements and satisfying student visa conditions. For more information and the current course fee for international students go to the TAFE NSW International website.

    Disclaimer

    While every effort has been made to ensure information about this course is accurate and up to date, you are advised to contact the course coordinator for specific and up to date information about tuition fees and academic requirements of the course.



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    Texas Bankruptcy Laws

    Thinking About Filing Chapter 7 or Chapter 13 Bankruptcy in Texas?

    Texas bankruptcy laws offer some of the strongest debt relief and protection in the nation. If you’re struggling under the heavy load of debt, Texas bankruptcy makes it easy to take action.

    You may be considering your options for debt relief. Under bankruptcy law, the two main ways for an individual to eliminate debt are Chapter 7 and Chapter 13 bankruptcy.

    If you’re ready to start working towards a fresh financial start, complete the free case evaluation form on this page and we’ll connect you with a local bankruptcy attorney in Texas .

    The Differences in Chapter 7 and Chapter 13 Bankruptcy in Texas

    The Texas Chapter 7 bankruptcy laws offer some of the strongest property protections of any state in the country.

    Chapter 7 bankruptcy is often a good option for people with lots of unsecured debt. This is the debt relating to credit cards, medical bills, personal loans and payday loans. This debt may be completely dismissed through the Chapter 7 discharge .

    But what sets Texas apart, are their healthy exemptions. If your property is covered by a Chapter 7 exemption, then that property cannot be sold to cover your debts. In Texas, your home is completely exempt, as is one car and up to $60,000 worth of property for a family!

    Homestead

    The full value of your home. Homestead is limited to:

    • 200 acres for a family outside a city or town.
    • 100 acres for a single adult outside a city or town.
    • 10 acres for anyone in a city or town.

    Wages

    • 100 percent of your wages and personal commissions.

    Automobiles

    • Full value of one automobile. Note: This value counts towards the $60,000 cap on personal property exemptions.

    Personal Property

    • Up to $60,000 worth of any personal property, including car, for a family.
    • Up to $30,000 worth of any personal property, including car, for a single adult.
    • 100 percent of certain health aids and religious books. This exemption doesn’t count towards the total value cap.

    To fully understand how to file for bankruptcy and how state laws could affect you and your property, speak with a local bankruptcy attorney.

    If you have more property than can be protected with Chapter 7, then Chapter 13 may be an option for you.

    Chapter 13 has even more broad property protections, and may be a good fit for those who have some regular, steady income. This form of bankruptcy can provide the breathing room you need to get your financial life in order. The reorganization of Chapter 13 bankruptcy can stop collections from creditors while ordering – and sometimes reducing – your debt.

    Learn More About Texas Bankruptcy Law

    The information provided here is only an overview. If you need answers to specific questions about your finances or about filing bankruptcy, speak with a Texas bankruptcy lawyer.

    To speak with a Texas bankruptcy lawyer practicing near you, all you need to do is complete the free bankruptcy case evaluation form on this page or call us toll-free at 877-349-1309. We’ll connect you with a local bankruptcy lawyer right away.

    Connect with one of our sponsoring Dallas bankruptcy lawyers or a sponsoring Houston bankruptcy attorney.

    Note: Keep in mind all laws are complex. If you need legal advice or want to fully understand how these laws affect you, please speak with a local Texas attorney about filing bankruptcy. Laws may have changed since our last update. For the latest information on your state’s bankruptcy laws, speak to a local Texas bankruptcy lawyer.

    Copyright © 2017 MH Sub I, LLC. All rights reserved. ® Self-help services may not be permitted in all states. The information provided on this site is not legal advice, does not constitute a lawyer referral service, and no attorney-client or confidential relationship is or will be formed by use of the site. The attorney listings on this site are paid attorney advertising. In some states, the information on this website may be considered a lawyer referral service. Please reference the Terms of Use and the Supplemental Terms for specific information related to your state.Your use of this website constitutes acceptance of the Terms Conditions , Supplemental Terms , Privacy Policy and Cookie Policy .

    Copyright © 2017 MH Sub I, LLC. All rights reserved. ® Self-help services may not be permitted in all states. The information provided on this site is not legal advice, does not constitute a lawyer referral service, and no attorney-client or confidential relationship is or will be formed by use of the site. The attorney listings on this site are paid attorney advertising. In some states, the information on this website may be considered a lawyer referral service. Please reference the Terms of Use and the Supplemental Terms for specific information related to your state.Your use of this website constitutes acceptance of the Terms Conditions , Supplemental Terms , Privacy Policy and Cookie Policy .



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    Medical Assisting

    For more info call:

    Degree for medical assistant

    Taking Action Together: An Interdisciplinary Team Approach

    Benefits of Fat Transfer

    Your fat transfer procedure offers the following benefits:

    • Uses your own natural fat, eliminating the possibility of an allergic reaction
    • Smooth, natural looking results
    • Long-lasting or permanent results
    • Little to no downtime

    Facial fat transfer procedures can be a great alternative to dermal fillers, reducing your risk of allergic reactions while providing longer lasting results. Ask Dr. Berger if this procedure is the right option to achieve your facial rejuvenation goals.

    Stem Cell Enhanced Fat Transfer

    Dr. Berger also offers a newer, more advanced fat transfer technique that incorporates stem cells. This stem cell enhanced fat transfer procedure uses naturally occurring regenerative cells from your body s natural fat. These stem cells increase the effectiveness of your procedure by enhancing the blood supply to the treatment area.

    Please contact Rejuvalife Vitality Institute using the form at the right side of the page or call (310) 276-4494 today to schedule your fat transfer consultation. Dr. Andre Berger serves patients in Beverly Hills and Los Angeles, California.