#business development

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Area of Interest

Business Development Opportunities

As the U.S. government’s leading IT contractor and global leader in science and engineering technology, we take on the world’s most important and complex challenges, and it wouldn’t be possible without our Business Development team. By helping negotiate and win client contracts with organizations around the world, we can work together to define the future.

At Lockheed Martin, each new contract is an opportunity we can build on together. Whether you’re looking for a client-facing role or to join an internal strategy team, we hire at all levels of experience and knowledge for positions in:

  • Business Analysis
  • Capture Management / Strategy
  • Customer Relations
  • Contracts
  • International Business Development
  • Market Research
  • Program Management
  • Proposal Management
  • Sales Engineering
  • Strategic Planning

Whatever your area of interest, in a business development career with us, your contributions are meaningful and your potential is limitless.

Explore opportunities at Lockheed Martin.

Search Jobs

Join Our Talent Network

Events

Lockheed Martin utilizes our own internal Talent Acquisition Organization to fill our employment needs. If you are contacted over the phone or e-mailed, by a company listing a Lockheed Martin job and requesting your personal information, allegedly on Lockheed Martin’s behalf, please do not respond. Lockheed Martin is an Equal Opportunity Employer. All qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, pregnancy, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, age, protected veteran status, or disability status.

www.dhs.gov/E-Verify
E-Verify is a registered trademark of the U.S. Department of Homeland Security. This business uses E-Verify in its hiring practices to achieve a lawful workforce.



#austin business journal

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AffiniPay Named to Austin Business Journal s List of Fastest-Growing Companies in Central Texas

Company climbs rankings in Austin Business Journal’s Top 50 fastest growing companies in Central Texas.

Austin, TX – July 1, 2014 – AffiniPay LLC. the premier payment provider for associations and the legal industry, has been ranked #19 by Austin Business Journal’s Fast 50 for 2013. AffiniPay has increased revenue from $1.6 million in 2009 to $6.7 million in 2012, a growth rate of 304% The Company has also been named to Inc. magazine’s Top 100 financial Service Companies, on top of being ranked No.1328 on Inc. 5000’s annual ranking of the nation’s fastest-growing private companies in America.

“AffiniPay is honored to be recognized as one of the fastest growing companies in Central Texas.” Said Amy Porter. CEO of AffiniPay. “Our team has worked incredibly hard to support our clients and provide a service that has quickly become the standard for payments in the association and legal industries. I am also extremely proud of what we have accomplished through our LawPay program, and we expect even more growth in the upcoming year.”

Austin Business Journal’s Fast 50 has been used to highlight Austin’s fastest growing companies for more than a decade. The rankings are based solely upon each company’s revenue numbers, and the competition is split into two groups, small and large companies.

“If you’re in the market for what they’re selling, consider giving them your business. If you’re a job seeker, these companies are right up your alley. If you’re looking for a stout strategic partner, deep-pocketed client or your next competitive threat, there’s a good chance they’re a click away.” states Colin Pope, one of Austin Business Journal’s most experienced business intelligence editors.

Complete results of the Austin Business Journal’s Fast-50 can be found here.

About Austin Business Journal

Austin Business Journal is the source for local business news, research and events in the Austin Area. Their mission is to provide their audience with the most accurate and useful information possible in print and online while serving as the primary facilitator of business events in the Austin area.

About AffiniPay LLC

Based in Austin, Texas AffiniPay is a full-service merchant account and online payment gateway provider. AffiniPay was created in response to demand from local, state and national organizations to work with a payment processor that understands the unique needs of association payment processes. Eventually AffiniPay’s Association Partners asked them to extend their custom payment solutions and friendly customer service to their members. Not only are AffiniPay’s services used and recommended by over 1,000 professional and trade associations across the US, they are the processing leader in the legal industry. AffiniPay’s unique LawPay program is endorsed and recommended by over 80 state and local bar associations. For information please visit https://www.affinipay.com/.

Need Expertise?

Our team of Certified Payment Professionals has the latest knowledge on payment solutions, PCI Compliance, and merchant account best practices for your association.



#business attire

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Business Formal Attire

A business formal dress code enhances the professional image of your workplace environment and your personal brand. This page provides style guidelines for on-campus activities where this dress code is required. The gallery and descriptions on this page help define “business formal.”

Clothing should be crisp, neat, pressed and never wrinkled, to project a professional, business formal image. Torn, dirty, and unmatched clothing is unacceptable.

The standard dress code in a business formal environment is a full matching business suit, including a jacket and dress pants or a dress skirt. The darker the suit, the more formal!

In addition to matching pants and jacket, men should wear a button-up collared shirt, paired with a tie. Refrain from wearing bold and bright colours or patterns in dress shirts; white, beige or light blue are safe colours for collared shirts. Choose a tie with colours and tones that match your suit and dress shirt; bolder colours and patterns are acceptable for ties. Some men choose to wear a three-piece suit, in which case the vest colour and material match the jacket and slacks.

A dress pant or skirt with matching jacket is considered business formal for women. Depending on the season, jackets may be ¾ length or short sleeve. A crop pant suit is also suitable, however the pant hem should hit mid-calf and this style is not recommended in an interview setting. Skirts should always sit at or just above the knee. A collared blouse or dress-material top is recommended, and should either be tucked in or fall just below your waistline. Tops should never hang below the hem of your suit jacket, or be so short that they show your stomach. Always be cautious that dress shirts are not too revealing in any business setting. Pantyhose are not required, however during the fall and winter seasons, darker pantyhose or tights are recommended when wearing skirts.

Depending on the colour or tone of your suit, a black or brown belt should be worn. Coloured or white belts are not recommended. Never wear white socks with a suit. Dress socks should always be worn, preferably in a tone matching your suit and shoes. When in doubt, wear black dress socks. Optional accessories for men include cufflinks or a pocket-square. The material should match the tie. If desired, women may wear simple and tasteful jewellery; chunky and/or bright accessories are not recommended.

Shoes, boots, flats, open-toed and closed-toed shoes in a leather or dress material are appropriate and should be clean and polished.

Jewellery, Makeup, Perfume, and Cologne

These should be in good taste, with limited visible body piercing. Makeup should be used minimally to represent a natural look. Remember, some colleagues are allergic to the chemicals in perfumes and makeup, so wear these substances with restraint.

Religious and Health Accommodations

Should a bona fide religious practice, belief or legitimate health need conflict with the dress code, reasonable accommodations will be made.



#dallas business journal

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Dallas Business Journal

Founded in 1977, Dallas Business Journal is the leading source for local business news, research, and events in the DFW area.

In addition to our weekly print publication, we also offer a digital edition, the annual Book of Lists, free Daily Email Update and other industry specific newsletters, and networking and awards events including the Best Places to Work, 40 Under Forty, Best Real Estate Deals, and Women in Business.

We are a division of American City Business Journals, the country s largest publisher of business publications. It is owned by Advance Publications, a private publishing company that also owns Condé Nast magazines and Newhouse Newspapers.

Related Staff

Anderson Trail produces and distributes The Original Premium Moist Granola. Their Original Recipe is a blend of almonds, cherries, coconut,

Catapult was formed in 2008 by Neil Waterman and a group of like-minded individuals who wanted to use their experience

BIOWORLD MERCHANDISING, INC. founded in 1996, is a leading design and distribution company of licensed and private label Apparel, Headwear,



#business plan outline

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All About Cash Flow

While we are trained to think of business as sales minus costs and expenses, which is profits, we have to manage cash as well.

Although cash is critical, people think in profits instead of cash. We all do. When you imagine a new business, you think of what it would cost to make the product, what you could sell it for, and what the profits per unit might be. We are trained to think of business as sales minus costs and expenses, which is profits. Unfortunately, we don t spend the profits in a business. We spend cash. Profitable companies go broke because they had all their money tied up in assets and couldn t pay their expenses. Working capital is critical to business health. Unfortunately, we don t see the cash implications as clearly as we should, which is one of the best reasons for proper business planning. We have to manage cash, as well as profits.

A simple example
One of the best ways to understand the dilemma of cash vs. profits is to follow an otherwise-profitable company going broke because it can t meet its obligations. This is a quick and simple example. It also leads us into the relationship between income statement, balance sheet, and cash.

Start with $100, which we ll call capital. At the beginning of this exercise, your balance sheet has assets of $100—the money—and capital of $100. Assets are equal to capital plus liabilities. A summary of the simple financial statement at this point is shown in this first illustration, Starting Numbers.

If you buy a widget for $100 and sell it for $150, you should end up with $50 profit, which is what your income statement covers. Sales minus costs are profit. You should have $150 in the bank. Now your balance sheet shows the same $100 in original capital plus $50 in earnings, which are equal to the $150 you have in cash as an asset. The next illustration shows you how the financials work after the sale.

Buy another widget for $100 and sell it again for $150, and now you have $200 in the bank. Do it again, you have $250 in the bank. Your income statement shows sales of $450, cost of sales of $300, and profit of $150. The illustration shows your income statement and balance sheet at this point.

Adding some realism
Now go back a step and make the situation more realistic. For example, most sales of products to businesses go on terms, with the money due in 30 days. So if you sold that widget on credit you don t have $150 in the bank. You still have $50 in your bottom line, but now you have nothing in the bank. Instead, a customer owes you $150, which is what we call “Accounts Receivable.” Compare the Sell a Widget illustration to this next illustration, Selling on Terms. This is what really happens to the huge number of businesses that sell to other businesses.

Knowing you can buy a widget for $100 and sell it for $150, you get your Widget supplier to sell to you on the same terms you sell, net 30, instead of for cash. Now you have $100 that you owe to suppliers, which is called “Accounts Payable.” You also have $100 worth of widget in inventory. This gives you the case in the following illustration, Buying on Terms, in which you are now poised to sell another widget and make more profit.

You have an extra $100 in assets (the widget in inventory) and an extra $100 as liabilities (Accounts Payable), so you are still in balance. Also, you still have no money. Our next illustration shows the financial picture with sales to businesses on credit and purchase of inventory on credit as a short-term debt.

Now the case is more like what you have with real business numbers, in which you have to manage your cash very carefully, and the amounts sitting in inventory and accounts receivable are significant.

More realism: working capital
Even in the case of the above illustration, the example is completely unrealistic. Where are the running expenses, such as rent, salaries, telephones, or even advertising those widgets? How would they affect the cash situation? How far would we get if we couldn t pay the rent or the telephone bill while waiting for customers to pay us? Furthermore, what supplier would give us a widget on credit when we have no history and no assets? What bank would loan us money in this situation? Banks do loan against inventory and receivables, but only to a certain percentage of total value. What was missing here, all along, was working capital.

Important: In strict accounting terms, working capital is equal to short-term assets minus short-term liabilities. In real terms, however, working capital is the glue that holds your cash flow together. Get it into the bank before you need it, or you won t survive the unexpected.

The following illustration goes back to the beginning of this whole example and does it right, with enough capital in the beginning to finance the company.

Instead of starting with $100 as capital, this business looks a lot better with starting capital of $400. With this additional capital from the start, buying on credit and borrowing against assets is more realistic. In this scenario, working capital is up to $550. Now it has a proper input of working capital at the beginning. With even the barest of business plans, we could tell that $100 wasn t enough to get this business going.

I hope the theoretical examples help make the concepts clear. If you followed these illustrations, you can see some enormous implications for running a business.

Important: Every dollar in accounts receivable means a dollar less in cash. Every dollar of inventory is a dollar less in cash. Every dollar of accounts payable is a dollar more in cash.

How LivePlan makes your business more successful

If you re writing a business plan you’re in luck. Online business planning software makes it easier than ever before to put together a business plan for your business.

As you ll see in a moment LivePlan is more than just business plan software though. It s a knowledgable guide combined with a professional designer coupled with a financial wizard. It ll help you get over the three most common business hurdles with ease.

Let s take a look at those common hurdles and see how producing a top notch business plan sets your business up for success.



#business license

#

If your business is involved in activities supervised and regulated by a federal agency – such as selling alcohol, firearms, commercial fishing, etc. – then you may need to obtain a federal license or permit. Here is a brief list of business activities that require these forms and information on how to apply.

If you import or transport animals, animal products, biologics, biotechnology or plants across state lines, you’ll need to apply for a permit from the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA).

If you manufacture, wholesale, import, or sell alcoholic beverages at a retail location, you will need to register your business and obtain certain federal permits (for tax purposes) with the U.S. Treasury’s Alcohol and Tobacco Tax and Trade Bureau (TTB). The website has a number of online tools that make this process straightforward. If you are just starting a business in this trade, start by reading the TTB’s New Visitors Guide which offers helpful information for small business owners.

Remember, you will also need to contact your local Alcohol Beverage Control Board for local alcohol business permit and licensing information.

Does your business involve the operation of aircraft; the transportation of goods or people via air; or aircraft maintenance? If so, you’ll need to apply for one or more of the following licenses and certificates from the Federal Aviation Administration:

Firearms, Ammunition and Explosives

Businesses who manufacture, deal and import firearms, ammunitions and explosives must comply with the Gun Control Act’s licensing requirements. The Act is administered by the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives (ATF). Refer to the following resources from the ATF to make sure your business is properly licensed:

If your business is engaged in any wildlife related activity, including the import/export of wildlife and derivative products, must obtain an appropriate permit from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

Commercial fishing businesses are required to obtain a license for fishing activities from the NOAA Fisheries Service. This guide includes quick links to permit applications and information.

If you provide ocean transportation or facilitate the shipment of cargo by sea, you’ll need to apply here for a license from the Federal Maritime Commission.

Mining and Drilling

Businesses involved in the drilling for natural gas, oil or other mineral resources on federal lands may be required to obtain a drilling permit from the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation and Enforcement (formerly the Minerals Management Service).

Producers of commercial nuclear energy and fuel cycle facilities as well as businesses involved in the distribution and disposal of nuclear materials must apply for a license from the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission

Radio and Television Broadcasting

If your business broadcasts information by radio, television, wire, satellite and cable, you may be required to obtain a license from The Federal Communications Commission (FCC).

Transportation and Logistics

If you operate an oversize or overweight vehicle, you’ll need to abide by the U.S. Department of Transportation offers guidelines on maximum weight. Permits for oversize / overweight vehicles are issued by your state government. Get contact information here .



#small business insurance

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Insurance coverage is available for every conceivable risk your business might face. Cost and amount of coverage of policies vary among insurers. You should discuss your specific business risks and the types of insurance available with your insurance agent or broker. Your agency can advise you on the exact types of insurance you should consider purchasing.

General Liability Insurance

Business owners purchase general liability insurance to cover legal hassles due to accident, injuries and claims of negligence. These policies protect against payments as the result of bodily injury, property damage, medical expenses, libel, slander, the cost of defending lawsuits, and settlement bonds or judgments required during an appeal procedure.

Product Liability Insurance

Companies that manufacture, wholesale, distribute, and retail a product may be liable for its safety. Product liability insurance protects against financial loss as a result of a defect product that causes injury or bodily harm. The amount of insurance you should purchase depends on the products you sell or manufacture. A clothing store would have far less risk than a small appliance store, for example.

Professional Liability Insurance

Business owners providing services should consider having professional liability insurance (also known as errors and omissions insurance ). This type of liability coverage protects your business against malpractice, errors, and negligence in provision of services to your customers. Depending on your profession, you may be required by your state government to carry such a policy. For example, physicians are required to purchase malpractice insurance as a condition of practicing in certain states.

Commercial Property Insurance

Property insurance covers everything related to the loss and damage of company property due to a wide-variety of events such as fire, smoke, wind and hail storms, civil disobedience and vandalism. The definition of “property” is broad, and includes lost income, business interruption, buildings, computers, company papers and money.

Property insurance policies come in two basic forms: (1) all-risk policies covering a wide-range of incidents and perils except those noted in the policy; (2) peril-specific policies that cover losses from only those perils listed in the policy. Examples of peril-specific policies include fire, flood, crime and business interruption insurance. All-risk policies generally cover risks faced by the average small business, while peril-specific policies are usually purchased when there is high risk of peril in a certain area. Consult your insurance agent or broker about the type of business property insurance best suited for your small business.

Home-Based Business Insurance

Contrary to popular belief, homeowners’ insurance policies do not generally cover home-based business losses. Depending on risks to your business, you may add riders to your homeowners’ policy to cover normal business risks such as property damage. However, homeowners’ policies only go so far in covering home-based businesses and you may need to purchase additional policies to cover other risks, such as general and professional liability.



#stock market quotes

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Data are provided “as is” for informational purposes only and is not intended for trading purposes. SIX Financial Information (a) does not make any express or implied warranties of any kind regarding the data, including, without limitation, any warranty of merchantability or fitness for a particular purpose or use; and (b) shall not be liable for any errors, incompleteness, interruption or delay, action taken in reliance on any data, or for any damages resulting therefrom. Data may be intentionally delayed pursuant to supplier requirements.

Market data charts delayed by at least 15 minutes. Powered by Interactive Data Managed Solutions .

Markets Diary represents composite trading.

Stocks: NYSE, Nasdaq and NYSE MKT stock quotes are delayed at least 15 minutes. Source: Dow Jones. International stock quotes are delayed as per exchange requirements. Source: SIX Financial Information.

Dow Jones stock indexes are updated in real-time except Dow Jones Shanghai index, delayed 20 minutes. Source: Dow Jones.

U.S. indexes are updated in real-time, except for the following delayed 15 minutes: PHLX, Russell, CBOE.

International indexes are updated in real-time, except for the following delayed 15 minutes: AEX, Bel-20, Bovespa, CAC 40, FTSE 100, FTSE 250, Hang Seng, ISEQ Overall, NZX 50, OEX All-Share, OMX, PSI 20, S delayed 20 minutes: All Ordinaries, S Economy: Consensus forecasts are provided by Econoday. “Actual” numbers are added to table after economic reports are released.

Barrons.com Markets Data Center Home – Market Data – Indexes – Stock Quotes



#franchise opportunities

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UK franchisee stories

Exclusive Interview: “Inspiring women into business ownership through franchising”

Alex Scotchbrook was Tutor Doctor s first ever UK franchisee when she launched in 2009. She now runs four territories, employs five members of staff and gives work to over 382 tutors in her community. Alex s business has helped over 2000 children not only get good exam results but to believe in themselves a skill for life! To get an inside view of Tutor Doctor. Read more..

UK Franchisor Interviews

Exclusive Interview: “We maintain the values of a family business”

As Franchise Director of Newton Fallowell, David Spackman is in a prime position to present the nuts and bolts of this award-winning franchise opportunity. In this exclusive interview find out why it has grown from one office into the growing franchise network it is today and see if this opportunity may be the right into business for you.

UK Franchisor News and Advice

Trevor Brocklebank named deputy chair of the bfa

The co-founder and chief executive of Home Instead Senior Care, Trevor Brocklebank, has been appointed as deputy chair of the British Franchise Association (bfa) after a unanimous vote by its board of directors. Read more..

Master licenses

Are you looking to expand your investment portfolio? Are you interested in becoming a master franchisee for an international brand? If so we will help you to understand how you can be involved in this exciting investment opportunity. Read more about buying a master franchise

Ask the experts

Franchising can be a very complex area and to make sure you find the right franchise for you, or set up your own franchise correctly, is it imperative that you do as much research as possible. This includes seeking professional help and advice. Our Ask the Expert section allows you to post questions regarding funding a franchise, legal issues, accountancy, consultancy and general franchise advice. Post your questions to our panel of experts

FRANCHISE OPPORTUNITIES SPOTLIGHT

Regional franchising

FRANCHISE OPINIONS

Franchising Step by Step

Whatever business you are in, planning and goal setting is important and none more so, than when you are buying a franchise. The step from employment to running your own business must be more than a leap of faith, it has to be a thought-out and well executed process to maximise the chances of success. In this article, Michael Johnson, Managing Director of Card Connection considers some of the basic points required for successful franchising .

Franchising your business

Are you considering franchising your business? If yes, we can help. Our “Franchise Your Business” section will help you to decide if franchising is the right expansion route for your business, and if so, how to franchise your business. Read more about franchising a business

Franchise resales

You don’t have to start a franchised business in the UK from scratch; many existing franchisees are looking to sell their franchise. In our resale section you will find advice on buying and selling a franchise resale, stories of those who bought a resale as well as listings of existing franchises for sale across the UK.

Microsites to suit you

Raising finance

It is a big step from deciding to start a franchise to actually opening your doors for business. For many, one of the biggest hurdles is approaching the bank for finance. Read more about funding a franchise

Settle down in the USA

Every year more and more people move to the United States of America and are successful in the immigration process. One of the most successful methods to achieve a permit to work and stay in the USA is through buying a business and creating employment.



#business attire

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Business Attire

What exactly is Business Attire? The term is used frequently, but can mean different things depending on the setting. Unless specified as business casual, one should assume business attire refers to business professional attire. There are a few generally accepted do s and don t s regarding attire in the workplace and other similar settings, which are explained below. The setting highly dictates what is and is not acceptable, and thus individual interpretation is expected.

Business Casual Business Professional

Business Casual

The key to business casual is exactly what the name implies; it s not quite business professional, but not casual either. You want to aim for attire that would be appropriate in a casual office setting. Typically, you should steer clear of denim, such as jeans, although the individual setting may allow for a dark-wash, clean cut jean to be worn. If you are unsure of the setting, air on the side of caution and go with a crisp pair of khakis, which will work in any setting described as business casual.

Some examples of what may be worn in typical business casual attire are as follows:

  • Skirt, khakis, or pants
  • Open-collar shirt, knit shirt or sweater (no spaghetti straps or décolleté)
  • Dress
  • Flats, heels, or nice sandals; no flip-flops, sneakers, or unprofessional heels
  • Seasonal sport coat or blazer with slacks or khakis
  • Dress shirt, casual button-down shirt, open-collar or polo shirt
  • Loafers or loafer-style shoes or closed-toe dress shoes

Business Professional

Business professional is a more clear-cut set of guidelines. Picture what comes to mind when you think of a corporate, business setting. Most people will be wearing suits, jackets, and the like. Neutral and darker colors are common, as well as simple choices when it comes to jewelry and shoes. Typically, this style of dress is what you will wear to a job interview. You can t go wrong with a matching suit or suit-style outfit and simple, dark colored shoes. If you want to express your personality, a nice pocket square or tie, and simple necklace can accentuate your ensemble without breaking the rules of professional attire.

Some examples of what may be worn in typical business professional settings are as follows:

  • Business-style dress
  • Dress with a jacket
  • Plain heels, typically closed-toe, or flats with closed-toe; either in simple styles and plainer colors
  • Suit; typically darker tones including black and dark gray; pants or skirt (knee length) acceptable
  • Button-up shirt
  • Tie; pocket square optional
  • Jewelery should be simple and not distracting
  • Professional dress shoes and dark dress socks