#business gifts

#

Top 5 Things to Pay Attention to When Giving Corporate Gifts

As the CEO of a small business, one of your main concerns is ensuring your employees know they feel appreciated. Aside from the frequent verbal praise you hopefully provide, the occasional gift can go a long way to making an employee feel valued.

Yes, you probably have a small office with a few coworkers if you’re just starting out but there will be a birthday, anniversary, or some extraordinary job done where gift giving is going to be expected. Giving a gift in the workplace can sometimes be tricky, but follow these simple rules to make sure your gift leaves a happy employee.

Get your budget in line.

Even if you’re giving a gift to a family member or friend, how much to spend is always one of the hardest things to figure out, and it’s even more difficult when coworkers are involved.

Always consider the reason of the gift. If you’re congratulating someone on a job well done, a $15 American Express gift card may be fine. If you’re celebrating a promotion or engagement, something a little more substantial may be appropriate.

Conduct research.

Before you do anything at your company, it’s either tested or researched thoroughly, right? In the same way, think about the person who you’re giving the gift, too and make sure you won’t give them anything that will offend them.

Examine their desk and see how they have it decorated. You should be able to find something that fits within their idea of a great gift. Are they fanatics about a sports team? Do they Starbucks on their desk every morning? Even though the best gifts come from the heart, remember that it’s okay to ask for help if you can’t figure out a great gift.

Gift for special occasions.

As the CEO, you’ll have plenty of opportunities throughout the year to give gifts to employees on special occasions. Whether you’re buying flowers for Secretary’s Day or get well soon gifts for a co-worker, it’s much easier to match a gift to the occasion than to buy one blindly.

Attach a handwritten note.

It’s easy to shoot off an email or copy and paste a typewritten note into a custom electronic card, but a handwritten note will make a much stronger impression. Remember one important thing about the person to whom you are writing and mention it in the note for maximum effect.

Deliver the gift personally.

Assuming your office and the gifts are small enough, deliver each gift you have purchased to each individual personally. Much like the handwritten note, it will create a much stronger impression when your gift is delivered in person. Plus, you can also use this time to catch up briefly with each of your employees.

Erin Leigh is a freelance writer for The Serious Teddy Bear Company, a gift basket company for every occasion, from teddy bear birthday gifts to employee and manager gifts. She’s a self-proclaimed gift giving expert and strives to find the perfect gift for any occasion.

Under30Experiences



#best business laptop

#

Best laptops for business 2016: Best laptops for UK business, choosing from Windows laptops vs Macbooks vs Chromebooks vs tablets

What is the best laptop for business? We find the best laptops for business 2016. Best laptops from Windows laptops vs Macbooks vs Chromebooks vs tablets. Advice on buying laptops for your business. (See also: 8 best powerful laptops for business .)

1. Best laptops for business: Budget Windows laptop

Almost every business will plump for a budget Windows lappy. and almost every business is right to do so. For a little over 200 you can pick up a perfectly serviceable, no frills notebook that will run all Windows software and connect to the web. Basically, it will do what you need it to do, without looking sexy. Potential down sides include weight and heft, life away from the mains. Cheap laptops don’t tend to have great battery life. Also you will need security software, and beware a cheap display that reflects the strip lights of your local Starbucks.

2. Best laptop for business: Ultrabook

Like a budget laptop, only better. And more expensive. Ultrabook is an Intel term for a thin-and-light Windows laptop that offers powerful performance and true portability. Other features might include a touchscreen, or tablet functionality. Ultrabooks offer all of the advantages of any Windows laptops, and more. But they are not cheap. In fact, at this price you may as well plump for a Macbook.

3. Best laptops for business: Macbook

Macbooks are what Ultrabooks are templated on. Sleek, portable, powerful. expensive. But generally great. There is no nicer laptop to use than a Macbook Pro. No more portable laptop than a Macbook Air. And running OS X means you have less to worry about on the security front. Down sides? Well price is one. Lack of Windows compatibility the other. But if you must have a Windows laptop, and price is not a major consideration, you can always run Windows on your Macbook.

New MacBooks in 2016: Podcast discussion

4. Best laptops for business: Chromebook

The joker in the pack. Chromebooks are laptops that run Google’s Chrome OS. In essence, they use Google Docs, Gmail and other Google tools instead of Windows or Mac software. You can use them when offline, but really they need a regular connection to the web to work. But Chromebooks are super cheap, as well as stylish and powerful. And there are no real security worries. Just don’t use a Chromebook if you need to use Windows, Office or any other Microsoft software. (Or games.) (For more, see: Review: Dell Chromebook 13 .)

5. Best laptops for business: Linux laptop

Another option if you can escape the world of Windows or OS X is Linux. A quick Google Shopping search throws up multiple laptops from the likes of Lenovo, HP and Acer that run on a Linux OS. Linux OSes vary, but in general the open source software is similar to Windows in look, feel and functionality. And being open source it can be tweaked to suit your business’ needs. There is no software licence fee, so the same hardware is often cheaper running Linux that it is Windows or OS X. And you don’t have the same security needs as you do in Windows. But compatiblity is an issue, with both software and other devices. Choice is limited. And you will get funny looks off your colleagues.

6. Best laptops for business: tablet

Microsoft would have you believe that the Surface Pro is the tablet that can replace your laptop. Apple makes similar claims about the iPad Pro. And there are myriad Windows tablets trying to squeeze in to the space. The truth is that if your major concern is portability, the Surface Pro in particular is a stunning device. Just expect to get what you pay for, and understand that the best laptop for using on your lap will always be. a laptop. (See also: iPad Pro vs Surface Pro for business .)

Related Articles



#best business laptop

#

Best Business Laptops 2016 (and Why We Love Them)

What do you need in your next business laptop? Whether it is fast performance, long battery life or just something that won t weigh you down on your daily commute, there s a great notebook for you. Here are our top picks for 2016.

[For more information on how we test mobile devices, visit our testing methodology page .]

Best Laptops For.

  • Ultraportable Laptop Dell XPS 13 (2015)

  • Screen size: 13 inches
  • Battery life: 7:24
  • Desktop dock: Yes
  • Fingerprint reader: No
  • Price: $799.99
  • Screen size: 12.5 inches
  • Battery life: 15:12
  • Desktop dock: Yes
  • Fingerprint reader: Yes
  • Price: $800.10
  • Screen size: 15 inches
  • Battery life: 4:46
  • Desktop dock: No
  • Fingerprint reader: No
  • Price: $449.99
  • Screen Size: 14 inches
  • Battery Life: 8.38
  • Fingerprint Reader: Yes
  • Desktop Dock: Yes
  • Price: $1,394.10

Best Overall Business Laptop

Lenovo ThinkPad X1 Yoga

The ThinkPad X1 Yoga is the most versatile business laptop money can buy, with solid performance, long battery life (check the chart below) and an included active stylus. And like other Yoga laptops, this one has a folding hinge that helps you get a good angle for jotting down digital notes right on its sharp 14-inch display.

The laptop has a flexible folding design and a built-in active stylus, which makes it easy to jot down notes and annotate documents right on its 14-inch display. It also lasts really long on a charge and has an excellent keyboard. – See more at: http://www.businessnewsdaily.com/8720-lenovo-thinkpad-x1-yoga-business.html#sthash.qiFrf3Qg.dpuf

Click here for a full review of the ThinkPad X1 Yoga from Busiess News Daily.

Best Ultraportable Laptop

Dell has refreshed its super-portable XPS 13 notebook with a more powerful processor, speedier storage and a bigger battery, without changing its stunning design. That makes the XPS 13 an even better option for commuters and frequent travelers who don t want to be weighed down.

  • Thin-and-light design
  • Long battery life
  • Fast performance
  • Excellent keyboard

Click here for a full review of the Dell XPS 13 from Business News Daily.

Best Laptop/Tablet Hybrid

Thanks to its much-improved keyboard, we finally feel comfortable calling the latest device in Microsoft s Surface Pro line our favorite 2-in-1 laptop for business. No other hybrid device can quite match the Surface Pro 4 s combination of portability, power and versatility. That includes top-notch pen support, so you can take notes right on the slate s display.

  • Kickstand
  • Digiziter stylus (included)
  • Keyboard (sold separately)
  • USB port
  • SD card slot

Click here for a Surface Pro 4 full review of the Surface Pro 4 from Business News Daily.

Best Small Laptop

Lenovo ThinkPad Yoga 12

The ThinkPad Yoga 12 is my favorite business notebook with a screen under 13 inches. You get a compact 12.5-inch screen, an industry-leading keyboard and good battery life. And true to its name, the Yoga 12 s screen can fold backward a full 360 degrees so you can use it like a tablet. Plus, the machine comes with a top-notch Wacom pen digitizer and a built-in stylus, so you can take notes right on the notebook s display. And since it s a ThinkPad, you get great business features like an extra-durable design, a TrackPoint pointing stick and a desktop docking port. Plus, it matches up very well against non-hybrid competitors in terms of performance (see chart below).

Best Chromebook

Toshiba Chromebook 2

Chromebooks aren t for everyone, but they re an affordable alternative for business users who have only basic computing needs. Toshiba s Chromebook 2 is the best overall package, offering a sharp, 13-inch display; a slim, lightweight frame; an impressive 8 hours of battery life; and faster performance than competing Chromebooks (see chart below). And you get all that for an affordable $329. Like other Chromebooks, this model runs on Chrome OS, which is not compatible with software made for Windows or Mac computers. Regardless, the Chromebook 2 is a great bargain for users who primarily want to check email, browse the Web and run basic apps.

Click here for a full review of the Chromebook 2 from our sister site Laptop Mag.

Best Budget Laptop

Asus VivoBook E403SA

The VivoBook E403SA delivers more bang for your buck than just about any other laptop, providing zippy performance in a slim package for just $400. You also get a 14-inch, full-HD display, a comfy keyboard and a lightweight design that won t weigh you down on your commute. Plus, its battery lasts all day.

Best Battery Life Laptop

Lenovo ThinkPad X260

Lenovo s ThinkPad X260 is the longest-lasting laptop on the market, bar none. It ran for an amazing 17 hours on a single charge, so it will have no trouble lasting through a long business flight or two. The X260 also gives you a durable design, strong security and fast performance even if it s a bit bulkier than other 12.5-inch notebooks.

  • Long battery life
  • Durable design
  • Excellent keyboard
  • TrackPoint pointing stick
  • Fingerprint reader (optional)

Click here for a full review of the Lenovo ThinkPad X260 from our sister site Laptop Mag.

[For more information on how we test mobile devices, visit our testing methodology page .]



#business plan format

#

Sample Business Plan Excel

Business plan template 7 download free documents in pdf sample Business Plan Template 7 Download Free Documents In Pdf Sample business plan writing plans with free sample template Sample Business Plan Excel paper on writing business plan with free sample business planning template software for business plans cash flow forecasting financial projections business strategy Business plan template 7 download free documents in pdf sample

posted by sampletemplates.com. Image Size. 580 x 619 jpeg 262kB and Upload Date and Time. Mon, 29 Aug 2016 22:09:00 GMT

Business plan format excel india by mqm16808 Business Plan Format Excel India By Mqm16808 free business plan software business planning business Sample Business Plan Excel free business plan with template for business plan plus business plan software shareware and advice Business plan format excel india by mqm16808

posted by img.docstoccdn.com. Image Size. 1275 x 1650 png 191kB and Upload Date and Time. Fri, 26 Aug 2016 14:27:00 GMT

Displaying 12gt; images for simple business plan template Displaying 12gt; Images For Simple Business Plan Template excel template and business plan template Sample Business Plan Excel free excel template business plan templates and financial accounting statements that are free downloads simply insert the numbers in the excel templates to create Displaying 12gt; images for simple business plan template

posted by 2.bp.blogspot.com. Image Size. 927 x 1200 jpeg 144kB and Upload Date and Time. Sat, 27 Aug 2016 06:55:00 GMT



#investment ideas

#

10 big investment ideas for 2016

  • Share on twitter

It’s time to fire up the interneuronal connections and carve out 10 big ideas for 2016.

Asian nation

My first offering is that Australia will likely become an Asian nation in its ethnic orientation. Apologies to the xenophobes, but it’s happening under your nose. An incredible 28 per cent of Australia’s population (or 6.6 million people) were born overseas – the highest in 120 years. During the last census a remarkable 12 per cent of Australians said they had Asian ancestry.

In Sydney and Melbourne, 19 per cent and 18 per cent, respectively, of residents are Asian. In Sydney regions like Parramatta and Ryde, the Asian share of the population is as high as 34 per cent and 33 per cent, respectively. China and India have overtaken the UK as Australia’s biggest source of new migrants, collectively accounting for 35 per cent of the intake in 2013-14.

The idea of Australia stealthily yet ineluctably becoming an Asian nation is a big deal: it will reinforce our unique antipodal trading position and powerful role as a politically stable economic conduit between east and west; it will help improve our cultural commonalities with major regional actors like China, India and Indonesia (mitigating geopolitical hazards); and it should serve as a source of innovation, productivity and growth, just as the influx of ambitious European migrants did after World War II.

Related Quotes

Bank returns on equity will fall

Idea number two is that the major banks’ returns on equity (RoEs) are inevitably going to fall from around 15 per cent towards their 11 per cent cost of equity as result of the banking system becoming a highly competitive and level playing field. While this process may take five years or more, it should mean that rather than trading at an unusually high two times book value, the majors will price at circa one times. If I’m right, there is much downside to current valuations, which is a proposition reinforced by analysts’ crazy forecasts that bad and doubtful debt charges will stay around 30-year lows.

In five years the majors will have ceded the competitive advantages that fuelled their world-beating RoEs. Rather than carrying 25 per cent more leverage than rivals, they will end up having less leverage and more equity capital in the funding mix. Combined with the fact that smaller banks tend not to source as much funding in the dearer wholesale bond markets – underwriting assets with cheaper deposits that are now a government-guaranteed (and more stable) funding source – I believe the majors will wind up having more expensive funding costs. In short, we will migrate to a system where the majors are much safer banks with reduced risks of failure, with the trade-off of lower returns on equity than competitors that have loftier leverage and lower funding costs. There should, therefore, be an economic role reversal between the big four and their rivals.

Another Macquarie Bank?

If the majors are going to become slow-moving, yet bullet-proof, utilities, a third idea is investors should look for superior returns from more fleet-footed alternatives that are not saddled with the financial baggage of being too-big-to-fail. One day we will eventually see another Nicholas Moore who creates a new Macquarie Bank with a much skinnier 50 per cent dividend payout ratio (compared to the majors’ 80 per cent pay-out policies) that retains earnings to support investments in innovative and entrepreneurial opportunities. Macquarie has done a fabulous job of continuously reinventing itself to maintain growth and studiously avoided allocating too much capital to competing in the majors’ commodity markets.

On this note, the majors will likely lose significant market share in home loans to regional banks that for the first time will be able to compete effectively with them on price without crushing their returns. Rather than being price setters, the majors will become price takers and have to give back the recent rate hikes they have foisted on borrowers to compensate for expanding equity funding costs or suffer market share losses. This will compel them back into the less contested business lending space, which will lubricate credit to companies. Indeed, I think the majors’ balance-sheet splits between residential and business loans will revert back to the 40:60 levels before the 1991 recession.

Our forecasts for double-digit house price growth in 2013 and 2014, and high single-digit growth in 2015, were spot on. My fourth idea is that there will be no imminent housing collapse, and the price of our bricks and mortar will again climb in 2016, albeit at a much slower pace of around 1 to 2 times income growth. I maintain the view that the market is very expensive (15 to 25 per cent above fair value) and recently sold my own home. The interest rate hikes that will be the catalyst for a sustained Aussie housing correction appear to have been shunted into the distant future.

A fifth idea is that as the US and UK jobless rates (5 and 5.3 per cent respectively) fall towards 3 per cent in 2016 and 2017, wage and consumer price inflation will gradually reanimate. While the Fed will hike in December, central banks will get behind the curve because of their desire to “look through” this reflation.

Fixed-rate bond prices to plummet

This prompts another idea, which is that fixed-rate bond prices will melt as long-term yields rise on the back of financial markets resisting the Fed’s dovish view of the world and acknowledging stubbornly strong inflation data. The existential moment for global central banks will arrive when the break-even inflation rates priced by the bond market begin breaching official inflation targets in a sign that investors no longer think that monetary policy (and so-called nominal growth targeting) is compatible with price stability. Asset allocators need to be short interest rate duration or, if you have to be exposed to this risk, hire a smart duration manager – they can be hard to find. Few people can consistently call rate changes right.

If this base case plays out, my seventh thought is that global equities will face tremendous headwinds as long-term risk-free rates (that is, government bond yields) mean-revert back to some semblance of normality, which means yields 50 per cent to 100 per cent higher than current marks. Recall that the 10-year government bond yield is an essential input as the underpinning for the discount rates in the valuation models for all listed and unlisted equity and real estate markets.

Sell ‘beta’ buy ‘alpha’

This insight furnishes an eighth idea, which is sell equity “beta” and buy “alpha”, as I advocated last year. Aussie shares (beta) have declined over the year to date while market-neutral and long-short hedge funds (alpha) have delivered terrific returns (at least the guys that I invest with have). This dynamic is unlikely to change.

In the more immediate term (over the next, say, one to two years), I like “spread” assets as the search for yield will remain a critical influence over investor behaviour as long as deposits do not offer any material “real” returns above inflation and equities continues to get hammered. One example is major bank subordinated bonds, which currently trade very cheaply on a global basis despite the majors being among the best capitalised banks globally, care of $33 billion of equity origination over the last 12 months. The credit ratings on major banks’ subordinated debt are on par with the senior bonds issued by Goldman Sachs, Morgan Stanley or Citigroup, and I think there is a decent chance they will get upgraded to the “A” band next year if Standard & Poor’s lifts the majors’ stand-alone credit profiles from “a” to “a+”, as it has signalled it may do.

A final thought is that if the world is once again forced to choose between elevated interest rates and high and volatile inflation, there is a possibility that the value of paper money will atrophy as a credible medium of exchange. This could precipitate a flight to safety in the form of a resurgence in the demand for gold as a hedge against the debasement of money by governments using the printing press to finance their own deficits.